PHILOMENA

Politically Correct Attack on Christianity

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 29, 2013

Starring: Judi Dench, Steve Coogan,
Sophie Kennedy Clark, Mare
Winningham, Barbara Jefford,
Ruth McCabe, Peter Hermann,
Sean Mehan

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: The Weinstein Company

Director: Stephen Frears

Executive Producer: Carolyn Marks Blackwood,
Francois Ivernel, Chrstine
Langan, Cameron McCracken,
Henry Normal

Producer: Steve Coogan, Tracey Seaward,
Gabrielle Tana

Writer: Steve Coogan, Jeff Pope

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein, Co-Chairmen, The Weinstein Company (Radius-TWC/Dimension Films)
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400; Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(RoRoRo, PCPCPC, HH, AbAb, CC, FRFR, HoHo, LL, S, A, MM) Very strong Romantic worldview with a politically correct attack on traditional Christian morality in the church and on church authorities, including some lying nuns are the real villains of the movie, in a story about an elderly Irish Catholic woman searching for her long-lost son, with one major humanist character constantly makes fun of Christianity and religion and says he doesn’t believe in God, but the title character has a simple positive Christian faith so there are paintings of Jesus, lighting of candles in the church, religious icons, icons of Mary and Baby Jesus, an icon of Jesus on the cross, icons of saints, woman goes to confession but says nothing, character says something’s “in God’s hands now,” implied praying to a saint, women puts an icon of a saint in car and says it’s for good luck, praying, but Catholic nuns are the enemy, man states he doesn’t believe in God, plus movie’s dominant worldview seems to have an antinomian attitude about morality, and so there are strong politically correct references to homosexuality, and a man kisses another man; four light obscenities, five “f” words, two profanities, and some crude commentary; no violence; kissing, implied sex outside of marriage, homosexuality, man kisses man; no nudity but women giving birth; light drinking; no smoking or drug use; and, lying, bad role models, pro-family Republican character is discovered to be a homosexual, one character deliberately forgives but another says he cannot forgive.

Summary:

PHILOMENA stars Judy Dench as a married Irish Catholic woman who searches for the long-lost son who was taken away from her 50 years ago after she had an unwed pregnancy. Although Dench’s simple Christian character is viewed as somewhat heroic, the movie ends up being a politically correct attack on the Roman Catholic church and traditional Christian views of marriage and homosexuality.

Review:

PHILOMENA stars Judy Dench as an Irish Catholic woman searching for her son who was taken from her almost 50 years ago. Although Dench’s simple Christian character is viewed as somewhat heroic, the movie ends up being a politically correct attack on the Roman Catholic church and traditional Christian views of marriage and homosexuality.

During her youth, Philomena became pregnant out of wedlock. Not knowing what to do, her father put her in the convent. Philomena had to work in the laundry mat in order for the nuns to take care of her child, Anthony. The nuns would only allow Philomena and the other mothers visit their children for an hour a day, saying that they need to serve for their sins of impurity. One day, Philomena watches as little Anthony is taken away for adoption.

Completely in distress, Philomena spends 50 years looking for Anthony. A journalist, Martin, hears about Philomena’s situation and decides to take on the story as a human-interest article. Martin has been very angry with his life after being accused of saying something offensive and being fired. Martin and Philomena start off by going to the convent, but the nuns tell Philomena their records have been burned in a fire.

When at the local bar near the Convent, Martin and Philomena get some info from the bartender, who tells them the many of the children adopted from the convent went to America. So, Martin and Philomena decide to hop on a plane and go to Washington D.C. There, Martin has an epiphany of who Anthony is. He realizes he met him many years before, when Anthony was an influential Republican and a closeted homosexual. Another pivotal moment occurs when Martin and Philomena meet with one of Anthony’s closest friends, but it only make Philomena’s task of finding closure even more challenging.

Once again, Judy Dench does a completely believable job playing the title character in PHILOMENA. Although Dench’s simple Christian character is viewed as somewhat heroic, the movie ends up being a politically correct attack on the Roman Catholic church and traditional Christian views of marriage and homosexuality. The movie often uses humor to religious faith. The journalist is an atheist who’s completely rejected God and spends most of the movie mocking religion. Finally, the nuns are seen as the real villains. They lie during the entire movie and are depicted as having a mean attitude toward Philomena and the other girls with an unwed pregnancy. Their evil is contrasted with Philomena’s simple, but relatively amoral, faith, including her spirit of forgiveness. The ultimate effect of all this is to turn Jesus into a liberal wimp who makes no moral demands or moral judgments whatsoever. Of course, in the Book of Mark, the first public advice Jesus gives to people begins with the word, “Repent” (Mark 1:15). PHILOMENA’s Romantic worldview also seems to be promoting the radical pro-homosexual agenda of the Anti-Christian Left. The movie also contains some strong, but brief, foul language, and a politically correct attack on Republican conservatives promoting traditional family values.

In Brief:

PHILOMENA stars Judy Dench as an Irish Catholic woman searching for her long-lost son, who was taken from her 50 years ago. During her youth, Philomena became pregnant out of wedlock. Not knowing what to do, her father put her in a convent. Later, the nuns put her son, Anthony, up for adoption. Ever since Anthony was taken, Philomena has been looking for him. A journalist named Martin Sixsmith hears about her story and decides to help Philomena. They travel to America to find Anthony.

Judy Dench does a completely believable job playing the lead character in PHILOMENA. Although her Christian character is viewed as somewhat heroic, the movie ends up being a politically correct attack on the Roman Catholic church and traditional Christian views of marriage and homosexuality. The movie often uses humor to mock religious faith. The journalist is an atheist and spends most of the movie mocking religion. Finally, the nuns are the real villains. They lie during the entire time. Their evil is contrasted with Philomena’s simple, but relatively amoral, faith. Media-wise viewers will reject the movie PHILOMENA.