PINA

Dancing Documentary

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 13, 2012

Starring: Regina Advento, Malou Airaudo, Ruth Amarante

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older children and adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 106 minutes

Distributor: Sundance Selects/Rainbow Media

Director: Wim Wenders

Executive Producer: Jeremy Thomas

Producer: Gian-Piero Ringel, Wim Wenders

Writer: Wim Wenders

Address Comments To:

Evan Shapiro, President, Sundance Channel (Sundance Selects)
Rainbow Media Holdings LLC (Independent Film Channel/IFC Films/IFC First Take/Sundance Channel/AMC/WE)
11 Penn Plaza, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (646) 273-7336; Fax: (646) 273-7260
Website: www.sundanceselects.com/

Content:

(PaPaPa, RoRo, V, S, NN, D, MM) Very strong mixed pagan worldview with a modern take on dance with Romantic elements; no foul language; some violence when people push each other and women falling into the ground and walking into walls; some sexual innuendo; brief upper female nudity, upper male nudity, shear dresses on women, and men and women in underwear; no drinking; smoking but no drug use; and, man wears a dress for dance scene, movie creates an idol out of the title character who’s dead, a mention of angels.

Summary:

PINA is a documentary highlighting the legendary choreographer, Pina Bausch, with scenes of four dance performances and interviews with the dancers. PINA is beautifully produced in 3D to make the viewer feel like they are watching the dancers in front of them on the stage, but the movie seems to idolize Pina Bausch to a high degree, and there doesn’t seem to be much more of a storyline beyond that.

Review:

PINA is a documentary from Germany highlighting the legendary choreographer, Pina Bausch. Showing the dance movements almost coming out at the viewer in 3D, PINA is beautifully produced, but does not have much of a storyline.

Pina Bausch is a legendary choreographer in the dance world. Growing up in Germany, Pina had a very artistic sensibility and expressed that in her dance. Creating pieces that made the audience think, Pina worked with her dancers to get an emotional response that would show. Towards the end of her life, Pina had compiled a large company of dancers from all over the world, each being touched by the interesting style Pina had created. Sadly though, Pina died suddenly, and the dancers were left with telling her story through the documentary PINA.

PINA shows each of the dancers that were in the company, along with solo pieces Pina had choreographed for each dancer. Pina’s dancers are from all over the world, different shapes and sizes, and some young and old. In the film, older men and women are shown doing some remarkable dance moves, in a beautiful representation of age, juxtaposing the usual standard for the dance world. Pina’s style is modern, with emotional meanings.

PINA is a beautifully crafted 3D Documentary. It shows many clear, fluid dance movements in the style of Pina Bausch. The style in itself implies a modern worldview. The problem with the movie is that it has no storyline. The long scenes of dance performances may seem tedious to sit through if the viewer isn’t a fan of modern dance. The 3D effects heighten the movie’s beauty, however, despite the limited content. There are segments of the dancers, one by one, sitting in front of the camera, documentary style, but not looking into the camera nor speaking at it with just dialog over, so the viewer is just left to watching someone sit in front a camera extremely awkwardly. This technique doesn’t work, because the viewer wants to relate to the people on camera and the lack of eye contact can distract. PINA seems to idolize Pina Bausch to a high degree, one woman even wishing Pina would appear in her dreams. The movie also contains brief explicit nudity.

In Brief:

PINA is a documentary highlighting legendary choreographer Pina Bausch. Growing up in Germany, Pina had an artistic sensibility that she expressed in her dance. Creating pieces that made viewers think, Pina worked with her dancers to get an emotional response. Toward the end of her life, Pina compiled a large company of dancers from all over the world, each touched by the interesting style Pina created. Sadly, Pina died suddenly, and the dancers are left to tell her story without her.

PINA shows the dancers in Pina’s company, along with solo pieces Pina choreographed. Some dancers are young, and some are old. Older men and women are shown doing remarkable dance moves, in a beautiful representation of age. The problem is the movie has no storyline. Also, the long dance scenes seem tedious. The 3D effects heighten the movie’s beauty, however. There are segments of dancers sitting in front of the camera, documentary style, but not looking into the camera. This technique doesn’t work because of the lack of eye contact. Also, PINA idolizes Pina Bausch to a high degree, with one woman even wishing Pina would appear in her dreams.