PLAY THE GAME

Love or Lust?

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 28, 2009

Starring: Paul Campbell, Andy Griffith,
Doris Roberts, and Marla
Sokoloff

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 105 minutes

Distributor: Slowhand Cinema Releasing

Director: Marc Fienberg

Executive Producer: Eva Gordon

Producer: Marc Fienberg and Jennifer
Schaefer

Writer: Marc Fienberg

Address Comments To:

Marty Zeidman, President
Slowhand Cinema Releasing
4751 Wilshire Blvd., 3rd Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90010
Phone: (323) 549-4316
Fax: (323) 549-4314

Content:

(HH, LL, V, SS, N, AA, MM) Strong humanist worldview; 12 obscenities and profanities; elderly man considers suicide; strong sexual immorality includes multiple off-screen sexual interactions, overt sexual discussions, sexual arousal joke, including implied male arousal, elderly man becomes a gigolo after his wife passes, and a married man admires another’s sexual promiscuity; upper male nudity; some alcohol consumption and several jokes about getting the opposite sex drunk to take advantage of them; no smoking or drugs; lying to women in order to attract them and man fakes a stroke to tease his grandson.


Summary:

PLAY THE GAME’s David Mitchell teaches his lonely grandfather, Joe, everything he knows about attracting the ladies. This predictable movie is filled with lewd innuendo and off-screen promiscuity, plus some foul language.


Review:

PLAY THE GAME tells the story of David Mitchell (Paul Campbell), a young and successful car salesman who has a knack for getting people to do what he wants. This talent ranges from convincing customers into buying cars far out of their price range to tricking any girl to go out with him. One day he decides to visit his Grandpa Joe (Andy Griffith) in a nursing home after several months without so much as a phone call. Joe cannot seem to get over the death of his beloved wife and even contemplates suicide.
David wants to see his grandfather happy again, so he teaches Joe all of his secret steps to attracting a “babe.” Before long, Joe has enormous success with single and attached elderly women and becomes the nursing home gigolo. Meanwhile, David meets the one girl who doesn’t fall for his tricks: Julie (Marla Sokoloff). No matter how many schemes he devises, Julie never seems to fall for him. This frustration eventually leads David to realize she is the only girl he has ever loved.
PLAY THE GAME has several twists and turns, most of which are predictable but enjoyable nonetheless. Sex begins as the pinnacle of David’s life, but through the course of the movie, true love reigns triumphant. On the other hand, fans of THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW will hardly recognize Griffith’s Grandpa Joe, who is crude and sexually deviant. This is a stark contrast to the well-loved policeman in Mayberry. Obviously, Griffith was cast to attract the adult crowd, but his character is such an extreme departure that the filmmakers might as well have cast an unknown.
PLAY THE GAME is unnecessarily crude. It seeks to attract an audience of both young and old. But the foul language and numerous sexual situations automatically turns off half of their hoped demographic. In that respect, the movie often loses balance and struggles to find its footing. However, the movie does have its fair share of laughs and is entertaining enough for older viewers. MOVIEGUIDE® discourages younger viewers from watching this film, as it may teach them a perverse view of love and male/female relationships.


In Brief:

PLAY THE GAME tells the story of David Mitchell, a young and successful car salesman who has a knack for convincing any girl to date him. David wants to see his lonely widowed grandfather, Joe, happy again, so he teaches Joe all of his secret steps to attracting a “babe.” Soon, Joe has enormous success with single and attached elderly women and becomes the nursing home gigolo. Meanwhile, David meets the one girl who doesn’t fall for his tricks: Julie. No matter how many schemes he devises, Julie never seems to fall for him. This frustration eventually leads David to realize she is the only girl he has ever loved.
PLAY THE GAME is unnecessarily crude. It seeks to attract an audience of both young and old, but the foul language and numerous lewd situations automatically turn off half of their hoped demographic. In that respect, the movie often loses balance and struggles to find its footing. However, the movie does have its share of laughs and is entertaining enough for older viewers. MOVIEGUIDE® discourages younger viewers from watching this film, as it may teach them a perverse view of love.