POLICE, ADJECTIVE

Slow Moving Romanian Drama

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 23, 2009

Starring: Dragos Bucur, Vlad Ivanov, Irina Saulescu, Ion Stoica, Marian Ghenea, and Cosmin Selesi

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: NR

Runtime: 113 minutes

Distributor: IFC Films

Director: Corneliu Porumboiu

Executive Producer: None listed

Producer: Corneliu Porumboiu

Writer: Corneliu Porumboiu

Address Comments To:

Jonathan Sehring, President
IFC Films/IFC Entertainment
Joshua Sapan, President/CEO
Rainbow Media Holdings LLC
(Independent Film Channel/IFC Films/IFC First Take/AMC/WE)
11 Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 324-8500
Website: www.rainbow-media.com

Content:

(HH, AbAb, C, B, A, DD, M) Strong humanist and anti-Christian worldview with one minor character said to be a Christian but movie rejects using the Bible as an objective, transcendent moral standard for society’s laws; no obscenities or profanities; no violence; no sexual content; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking by main character and others plus teenagers smoking marijuana; and, disrespecting authority.


Summary:

POLICE, ADJECTIVE is a Romanian movie about an undercover police officer who refuses to arrest a teenager on possession of marijuana in hopes of catching his dealer. While there is little negative content, the movie’s message is very humanist because it rejects using the Bible as an objective, transcendent moral standard for society’s laws.


Review:

POLICE, ADJECTIVE is a Romanian movie about Christi, an undercover police officer who refuses to arrest a teenager on possession of marijuana in hopes of catching his dealer. His superiors want him to arrest Viktor, the teenager, for dealing drugs, but Christi thinks marijuana will be legalized shortly, so he would hate to arrest the teenager and ruin his life just for possessing and selling marijuana.
The conflict comes to a head when the police chief tries to explain to Christi that his conscience should want to follow the law and not follow his own internal “moral law.” Christi gives in and prepares to arrest the teenager.
For American audiences, this movie probably moves way too slow. There are long, tedious shots of the main character walking down halls, streets, eating breakfast alone, walking, and then walking some more. All the scenes happen in “real time” and often in one, single wide shot.
This attempt at realism borders on tedium. There is a sense of dry wit, which again, American audiences may not appreciate, perhaps because of cultural differences. Christi never becomes sympathetic in part because the movie never helps viewers understand why he doesn’t want to arrest the youth except that Christi simply thinks marijuana should be legalized.
Ironically, there is no moral center of this movie which is supposedly about a clash of conscience. When the police chief tries to point out to Christi that he should do his job and uphold the law, he painfully points out that society’s laws are the only things that can be the standard. He even says that the Bible can no longer be trusted, though his secretary does believe in it. So, without the Bible, we have to trust society’s laws. What the police chief misses is that, without the Bible, society has no laws because God’s moral laws are the basis of all civil law.
While there is little negative content, movie’s message is very humanist because it ultimately rejects using the Bible as a moral standard. Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.


In Brief:

POLICE, ADJECTIVE is a Romanian movie about an undercover policeman who refuses to arrest a teenager for possessing marijuana, in hopes of catching his dealer. Christi’s superiors want him to arrest Viktor, the teenager, for dealing drugs, but Christi thinks marijuana will be shortly legalized, so he hates to arrest Viktor and ruin his life. The conflict comes to a head when the police chief tries to explain to Christi that his conscience should want him to follow the law, not his own “moral law.” Christi relents and prepares to arrest Viktor.
For American audiences, this movie moves too slowly. All scenes happen in “real time.” Ironically, there is no moral center to this movie, which is supposedly about a clash of conscience. When the police chief tries to point out to Christi that he should uphold the law, he points out that society’s laws are the only things that can be the standard. He even says the Bible can no longer be trusted. While there is little negative content, the movie’s message is humanist because it ultimately rejects using the Bible as a moral standard. Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.