PRICE CHECK

Profane Morality Tale

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 16, 2012

Starring: Parker Posey, Eric Mabius,
Annie Parisse, Edward
Herrmann, Josh Pais, Amy
Schumer

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 92 minutes

Distributor: IFC Films

Director: Michael Walker

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Dolly Hall

Writer: Michael Walker

Address Comments To:

Jonathan Sehring, President, IFC Films/IFC Entertainment
Joshua Sapan, President/CEO, AMC Networks, Inc. (Independent Film Channel/IFC Films/IFC First Take/AMC/WE)
11 Penn Plaza
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 324-8500; Website: www.amcnetworks.com

Content:

(RoRo, C, B, LLL, S, A, MMM) Strong Romantic worldview about a businessman lured into an affair with his boss, offset by slight redemptive, moral elements as man saves his marriage in the end and his boss finds happiness with a husband and baby of her own, plus light references to Christmas; at least 70 obscenities and profanities (including plenty of “f” words and five GDs); no violence; implied adulterous fornication in two scenes and some lewd talk; no nudity; alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, lying and deception, gossip, backstabbing, revenge.

Summary:

PRICE CHECK is a character-driven comedy about a married man in a corporate supermarket job who, buried in debt and bored with his life, winds up getting lured into an affair with his new, high-strung female boss before learning the error of his ways. Vibrant performances and meaty moral dilemmas make PRICE CHECK an engaging, slightly redemptive movie for discerning adult viewers, but there’s far too much gratuitous foul language.

Review:

PRICE CHECK is a character-driven comedy about a married man in a corporate supermarket job who, buried in debt and bored with his life, winds up getting lured into an affair with his new, high-strung female boss before learning the error of his ways. The movie’s title is allegorical, as the plot basically presents the married man with the dilemma of how much money he’s willing to take to engage in immoral behavior (as his female boss approves him for a 100 percent salary raise while cutting other employees altogether due to labor costs).

Peter (Eric Mabius) is a long-suffering marketing wizard for a 7-11 style convenience store chain. When his new boss, Susan (Parker Posey), arrives in the office from another city, she immediately singles him out for a promotion to vice president and doubles his salary. While this makes his home life happier at first, Susan has lots of demands, including that he work late and travel with her on numerous business trips.

Soon, Peter is having to decide if the new money compensates for all the time away from his wife and young son. Beyond that, as Susan seduces him, he’s suddenly endangering his marriage and everything he worked so hard to achieve. While this sounds like a standard soap opera dilemma, Writer/Director Michael Wagner keeps Susan unpredictable. Also, as Peter sinks further into his trapped situation, both funny and serious aspects of his dilemma are explored.

The movie’s two sex scenes feature adultery, but they are mostly implied as the camera cuts away in the midst of passionate kissing. However, one of the two scenes features a fully clothed Susan sitting on top of a surprised Peter in her office while staffers hear noises and wonder what’s happening.

Ultimately, Peter is forced to face the dilemma of deciding whether the extra money is worth it. [SPOILER ALERT] The movie winds up with several pro-family jokes when it’s revealed Peter saved his marriage from near-divorce, and the boss moved on to her own husband, child and marital bliss as well.

PRICE CHECK is definitely a low-budget film, with most scenes taking place indoors. Despite this, its vibrant performances and meaty moral dilemmas make this an engaging film for discerning adult viewers. There’s far too much gratuitous foul language, however. This will prevent the movie from attracting a wider audience.

In Brief:

PRICE CHECK is a character-driven low budget comedy. Peter is a long-suffering marketing wizard for a 7-11 style convenience store chain. His new boss, Susan, singles him out for a promotion to vice president and doubles his salary. This makes his home life happier at first, but Susan has lots of demands, including that he work late and travel with her on numerous business trips. Soon, Peter has to decide if the new money compensates for the time away from his wife and young son. Things turn from bad to worse when Susan seduces him, endangering his marriage and everything he’s achieved. As Peter sinks further into this trap, the movie explores both funny and serious aspects of his dilemma.

PRICE CHECK is definitely a low-budget movie, with most scenes taking place indoors. Despite this, its vibrant performances and meaty moral dilemmas make it an engaging movie for discerning adult viewers. Also, the movie has a pro-family message at the end. Finally, the adultery scenes are somewhat restrained, but there’s far too much gratuitous foul language. So, extreme caution is required for PRICE CHECK.