PUSH

Pushed to the Edge

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 06, 2009

Starring: Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning, Camilla Belle, Cliff Curtis, and Djimon Hounsou

Genre: Science Fiction/Spy Thriller

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 121 minutes

Address Comments To:

Rob Friedman, CEO
Summit Entertainment
1630 Stewart Street, Suite 120
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 309-8400
Fax: (310) 828-4132
Website: www.summit-ent.com

Content:

(HH, Ev, B, O, AP, AC, Pa, LL, VVV, S, N, AA, DD, MM) Strong humanist worldview with implied evolutionary aspects and light moral points where some people in the world have physically developed special, but not always completely reliable, psychic powers such as telling the future, blasting glass and people’s bodies with the sound of their voice, moving objects with their will, changing the look and feel of objects temporarily, and mind control (the powers seem to have a physical source in the movie’s worldview, not of supernatural origin), plus anti-American government content with agents from the American government being one group of bad guys who force people with special psychic powers to work for the government and are also behind a plot to forcibly experiment on people with psychic powers, which often kills them according to the narration, with the other group being evil agents of the Communist Chinese government, and average citizens are caught in the middle, and movie is set in Hong Kong so there is one scene where young heroine wanders through a Buddhist place of some sort with monks and a person at a shrine; 15 obscenities (including at least one “f” word), two strong profanities and no light profanities; lots of strong action violence with some of it very strong with some blood such men blast fish tanks and glass windows in market area with the sound of their voices, men blast two men’s bodies until blood comes out of their ears, pointblank shooting murders, man stops bullets with his psychic powers, men move objects and people with their psychic powers such as throwing them off rooftops and piercing them with flying wood objects and slamming them hard against solid objects and walls, man hit in chest and killed by flying bamboo, man hit in neck and killed by flying bamboo, man makes unfinished building fall on top of man, woman controls several men’s minds and gets them to jump off a building or shoot their comrades, and some fighting with punching and kicking; no sex scene per se but some references in script by one man to leaving couple alone so they can get together sexually but it’s not spelled out if they really actually do anything explicitly sexual, although they are indeed left alone, but camera cuts away before any passionate kissing, going to bed action, etc.; brief upper male nudity; alcohol use by adults and 13-year-old gets whiskey in flask-shaped bottle and it is implied that she drinks it all and later she shows up drunk, and she is too lightly chastised; no smoking but villains force people to take potentially lethal drugs to enhance their psychic powers; and, gambling, man tries to cheat at gambling by using his psychic powers, and mind control against other people used by “good guys” and “bad guys.”

Summary:

The science fiction thriller PUSH is about a young man and a 13-year-old girl with psychic abilities who team up to stop ruthless American and Chinese agents from getting hold of a drug that enhances people’s psychic abilities, or kills them. PUSH is too confusing and slow in the middle before it gets to the climactic action and contains a humanist worldview, some strong foul language, light sexual references, some very strong violence, and a scene where the young teenager shows up drunk.

Review:

PUSH is a science fiction movie that plays like a spy thriller at times.

In the story, governments around the world, including the United States, are forcing people born with psychic abilities, including telling the future, mind control and moving objects and people with their will, to work for them. The movie opens 10 years ago in a hotel, where a boy named Nick listens as a government agent kills his father in a room nearby. Before he dies, his father tells Nick that if ever a young girl comes to him with a flower in her hand, he should do what she asks.

Cut to an American facility in the near future, where the government is trying to enhance people’s psychic abilities by injecting them with a special drug. The drug usually kills the patient, but one woman has survived. With psychic help from another patient, the woman escapes.

Cut again to Hong King. Nick has now grown up and is in hiding from the American government. He tries to use his psychic ability to move people and things with his will to win some money gambling, but he can’t control his power sufficiently, so he loses money. A 13-year-old girl named Cassie (who looks younger) contacts him. Cassie is sometimes able to tell the future. She wants him to help her find the missing woman from the earlier sequence, who has a mysterious case with something inside that could help both Cassie and Nick in their fight against the American government. At first, Nick’s not convinced but later she shows up with a flower in her hand, the prophecy of his father coming back to him.

The problem is, the American agent who killed Nick’s father is also looking for the woman and the case. So are ruthless agents from the Chinese Communist government. Eventually, Nick finds out that the woman is Kira, a girl with mind control powers that he fell in love with in America.

PUSH plays more like a convoluted spy thriller rather than an action thriller. The first act of PUSH is confusing at times, and the second act is too slow. The movie picks up as the plot develops, but it may be too late for many viewers, especially those looking for the action that the movie’s trailers promise. Also, the movie gives viewers little reason to like Nick, Cassie and the friends who show up to help them, other than the fact that the American government is trying to exploit them, and even kill them if they refuse to play along.

The only thing that mitigates the movie’s negative portrayal of the American government is its portrayal of the Chinese government agents, who seem even more ruthless. The movie would be more acceptable to American audiences if there were some American agents in the story who do the right thing.

Also, while psychic abilities can be occult, the psychic abilities in this movie are put in a science fiction, humanist context that hints of evolution, not magic or witchcraft. That said, there are some humanist-type religions, including New Age groups, that try to capitalize on this idea of people physically developing psychic powers, usually through some kind of evolutionary process, or perhaps some kind of alien science and technology. While it is true that some people in this life have an advantage over others because they have the gift of gab or know how to invest in the stock market, the movie’s notion of psychic powers shows how people with these powers, including the so-called good guys, can use such power to take advantage and control of other people, and even exploit them. That includes the use of mind control.

There’s something essentially elitist about this notion, as pointed out by MOVIEGUIDE®’s analysis of the occult powers Harry Potter has in those books by J.K. Rowling. In fact, the word “push” in the movie’s title actually refers to the mind control powers used in the story where someone can make another person do something they don’t want to do, even something that’s dangerously against their will. This is morally distasteful, if not abhorrent.

PUSH also contains some strong foul language, light sexual references, some very strong violence, and a scene where Cassie shows up drunk. This content and the movie’s humanist worldview require at least extreme caution.

In Brief:

The thriller PUSH opens by explaining that governments around the world, including the U.S., are forcing people with special psychic powers like moving things with their will alone to spy for them. One young woman escapes an American experimental facility. In Hong Kong, a 13-year-old girl, Cassie, asks a young man, Nick, whose psychic father was killed by American agents, to help her find the woman. She says the woman has something that could help their fight against the government. The American agent who helped kill Nick’s father is also looking for the woman and the case. So are ruthless agents from the Chinese Communist government.

PUSH plays more like a convoluted spy thriller rather than an action thriller. The movie is confusing and too slow in the middle. Also, it gives viewers little reason to root for the good guys. While psychic abilities can be occult, the psychic abilities in this movie are put into a science fiction, humanist context that hints of evolution, not witchcraft. The movie also contains some strong foul language, light sexual references, some very strong violence, and a scene where Cassie shows up drunk.