RV

Family Ties

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 28, 2006

Starring: Robin Williams, Jeff Daniels,
Cheryl Hines, Kristin
Chenowith, Joanna "JoJo"
Levesque, and Josh Hutcherson

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 99 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures/Sony
Pictures Entertainment

Director: Barry Sonnenfeld

Executive Producer: Bobby Cohen and Ryan Kavanaugh

Producer: Lucy Fisher and Douglas Wick

Writer: Geoff Rodkey

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment
(Columbia Pictures/MGM/TriStar/Screen Gems)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(B, LL, VV, S, M) Light moral worldview; nine mostly light obscenities (one SOB), eight light profanities, people use the word turd to describe large RV, and some bathroom humor regarding toilet facilities and sewage, which sprays protagonist when he tries to empty the toilet on an RV; strong slapstick humor such as man thrown off traveling RV, RV crashes into cement and brick posts guarding driveway, people slide down waterfall, man splattered with sewage, man on runaway bike down big hill, man fights raccoons off screen and raucous sounds are heard, and RV awning tears off; a few light sexual innuendoes but nothing, or very little, really salacious or borderline salacious; no nudity; alcohol use; no smoking; and, father lies to family, children are rude to father and father makes sarcastic comments about his children trying to avoid him, young environmental activist throws gunk in businessman's face, man steals laptop but gets caught and is thrown off vehicle, and mean condescending boss could care less about his employees' personal plans and need for family time.

Summary:

RV gives Robin Williams his first meaty comedy role in several years, as a business executive who takes his family on a vacation to Colorado in a huge recreational vehicle. RV has several very funny, though sometimes predictable, moments and contains some positive messages, but it also gets a PG rating for some foul language and crude humor.

Review:

Robin Williams has his first meaty comedy role in several years in the new moive, RV.

Williams plays Bob Munro, an executive at a large soda pop company who's in danger of losing his job to a younger man. Bob has scheduled a trip to Hawaii for his unappreciative family, but Bob's mean, phony boss orders him to attend a meeting in Boulder, Colo. to help him woo a smaller soft-drink company.

Instead of telling his family the truth, Bob rents a huge RV and tells them that taking a road-trip together to Colorado will bring them all closer together. Of course, Bob's wife, Jamie, and his two children, Cassie and Carl, are completely miffed. They think Bob is way over his head and knows very little about how to operate this vehicular monstrosity, which the children label "the rolling turd."

Sure enough, the trip goes downhill from the start. Adding to their traveling nightmares is the Gornicke family, a group of down-home, professional RV travelers who keep ingratiating themselves into the Munros' company.

A strange thing happens on the way to Colorado, however. Bob's notion that the trip will bring the family closer together begins to come true. Until, that is, they learn about Bob's real reason for the trip.

RV has several very funny, though sometimes or often predictable, moments that had many people in the screening audience in stitches. Robin Williams makes the most of his opportunity. It was also a pleasure to see the facial reactions to some of his character's predicaments of the actors playing his family.

RV also has a warm, chewy center, much like the s'mores that people make on similar camping trips. In the end, it's the family ties that bind, and all's well that ends well.

RV contains some foul language, a couple off-color jokes, some scatological humor about the RV's toilet pump, and lying. Only enough, however, to receive a well-deserved PG rating.

In Brief:

RV gives Robin Williams his first meaty comedy role in years. Williams plays Bob Munro, an executive at a large soda pop company who's in danger of losing his job to a younger man. Bob has scheduled a trip to Hawaii for his unappreciative family, but Bob's mean boss orders him to attend a presentation to a smaller soft-drink company in Colo. Instead of telling his family the truth, Bob rents a huge RV and tells them that taking a road-trip together will bring them closer together. His family is skeptical, but a strange thing happens on the way to Colorado. The trip does bring the family closer together. Until, that is, they learn about Bob's real reason for the trip.

Robin Williams makes the most of his opportunity here, as does whole cast. RV has several very funny, though predictable, moments that had many people in the screening audience in stitches. RV also has a warm, chewy center. In the end, it's the family ties that bind, and all's well that ends well. RV contains some crude humor and foul language. Only enough, however, to receive a well-deserved PG rating.