SAMSARA

Eastern Religion Idealized

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 24, 2012

Starring: ** Eastern Religion Idealized **

Genre: Documentary/Travelogue

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 102 minutes

Distributor: Oscilloscope Pictures

Director: Ron Fricke

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Mark Magidson

Writer: Mark Magidson, Ron Fricke

Address Comments To:

Adam Yauch
Oscilloscope Laboratories
Oscilloscope Pictures
511 Canal Street, 5E
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 219-4029; Fax: (212) 219-9538
Website: www.oscilloscope.net

Content:

(PaPaPa, PCPCPC, AcapAcapAcap, FRFRFR, C, VVV, SS, NN, MM) Very strong pagan, politically correct, anti-capitalist worldview promoting Eastern religion, including many positive scenes of Buddhist monks and temples while modern Western society is depicted with many shots of people rushing by in fast forward and countless speeding cars and with gruesome shots of meat processing, slightly mitigated by a Christian cathedral shown with appropriate wonderment and a beautiful sequence features several children being baptized, with some smiling widely in utter happiness as a result; no foul language; some strong and very strong violence includes male performance artist is shown sitting at a desk in a suit calmly before he has a meltdown in which he destroys his desk and the walls around him and freakishly puts makeup that makes him look like the Joker from “The Dark Knight” on his face, a mummified human corpse seen briefly in which the skin turned grey, a wounded veteran from the Iraq/Afghanistan war is seen at a cemetery in uniform with his hair and ears missing and his face scarred badly from third degree burns, a rolling machine is shown suctioning thousands of baby chicks into a tube where they are hurtled to their deaths, and both chickens and cows are shown being violently decapitated and gutted; strip club is shown with suggestive female dancers wearing kinky lingerie and a factory is shown briefly having plastic sex dolls go down an assembly line; upper female nudity of native women in Africa, scantily clad women in strip club, plastic sex dolls breasts shown, and upper male nudity in one scene; ; and, several obese pigs are shown trapped in cages with baby pigs suckling from them and an utter inability for any of them, especially the mother pigs, to move, a disturbing couple of shots show tribal women who have altered their faces with items that produce giant, distorted lips and moral equivalency when a very fat man is shown being prepared for weight-loss surgery after a sequence showing the mass production of meat and his body is marked up by a doctor with a marker to show where he will be cut into the man’s fatty flesh.


Summary:

SAMSARA is a very unusual travelogue documentary contrasting Eastern religion and Third World countries with modern capitalist society. SAMSARA is a disquieting experience, with graphic images of cows and chickens being slaughtered, that argues against Western capitalist society while showing Eastern culture in an idealized light.


Review:

SAMSARA is a very unusual travelogue documentary set to music designed to entrance audiences. It has a subtle but increasingly stronger anti-capitalist theme to its imagery as it goes along. It also seeks to elevate Eastern religions and Third World lifestyles as more pure than the fast-paced world of modern Western, capitalist culture. The title refers to the Hindu/Buddhist concept of the cycle of birth, suffering, death, and rebirth.
SAMSARA is filled with images of Eastern world monuments and nature. These are uniformly portrayed in stunningly beautiful fashion. In contrast, modern Western society is shown as cramped, rushed, and dehumanizing, with constant traffic and people bustling around without regard for one another. Only two sequences show Christianity positively. In one, a cathedral is shown with full wonderment for its splendors. In the second, a series of babies and children are shown happily being baptized.
Overall, however, the movie is marred by disturbing images of mass-produced meat. These scenes include graphic images of dead chickens and cows being sliced open. There are also images of pigs trapped in small cages as they endlessly are forced to let baby pigs suckle.
SAMSARA is a disquieting experience that argues against Western capitalist society while showing Eastern culture in an idealized light. The two positive Christian references can’t balance out the movie’s politically correct, pagan worldview. SAMSARA also contains some explicit nudity featuring native women and a visit to a modern strip club.


In Brief:

SAMSARA is a very unusual travelogue documentary set to music designed to entrance audiences. The movie is filled with images of Eastern world monuments and nature. These are uniformly portrayed in stunningly beautiful fashion. In contrast, modern Western society is shown as cramped, rushed and dehumanizing, with constant traffic and uncaring, bustling people. Two sequences show Christianity in a positive light. In one, a cathedral is shown with full wonderment for its splendors. In the second, a series of babies and children are shown happily being baptized.
Overall, however, SAMSARA is marred by disturbing images of mass-produced meat. These scenes include graphic images of dead chickens and cows being sliced open. There are also images of pigs trapped in small cages and endlessly forced to let baby pigs suckle. Ultimately, SAMSARA is a disquieting experience that argues against Western capitalist society while showing Eastern culture in an idealized light. The two positive Christian references can’t balance out the movie’s politically correct, pagan worldview. SAMSARA also contains some explicit nudity featuring native women and a visit to a modern strip club.