SOMEONE LIKE YOU

Someone Like Hugh!

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 30, 2001

Starring: Ashley Judd, Greg Kinnear, Hugh Jackman, & Marisa Tomei

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor:

Director: Tony Goldwyn

Executive Producer: Jim Chory

Producer: Lynda Obst

Writer: Elizabeth Chandler

Address Comments To:

Tom Rothman & Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
A division of Fox, Inc. & News Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(Pa, Ro, Fe, LLL, S, N, A, D, M) Pagan worldview with romantic elements as well as feminist elements about a woman who wants success in the working world & romance; some crude language, including 16 strong obscenities, 4 mild obscenities, & 13 profanities; sexual elements such as cows mating, man portrayed as womanizer, mention of masturbation, heavy kissing, woman searches for diaphragm, implied fornication, man has hickey on neck, & man touches woman’s breasts; partial rear male nudity, woman & man in underwear & couple lies naked under covers together; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying & cohabitation.

Summary:

SOMEONE LIKE YOU is the story of Jane Goodale (Ashley Judd), a young woman searching for success in the business world as well as romance. SOMEONE LIKE YOU is a witty and charming comedy, but there is plenty of foul language and one character has despicable sexual habits but becomes reformed.

Review:

In the movie SOMEONE LIKE YOU, Jane Goodale (Ashley Judd) is a beautiful, young New Yorker working as a talent booker for a popular talk show. Jane’s life currently revolves around her search for the perfect man while being successful in the working world. Although she works very hard for “Diane Roberts Live,” she seems to obsess over finding the reason for a man’s tendency to become disinterested in a woman after a short period of time. Relating men to the animal world, Jane creates a theory that men always want new women.

Among the colorful characters Jane works with is Eddie (Hugh Jackman), also known in the office as a womanizing jerk. Jane despises Eddie’s way of life, especially the way he treats women. However, when the charming Ray Brown, the show’s new executive producer, comes into the picture, Jane thinks there may be hope for all men. Ray (Greg Kinnear) sweeps Jane off her feet, while being very honest about his girlfriend of three years. Jane and Ray soon begin to fall in love and decide to look for a place to live together. The next step for Ray is to break up with his long-term girlfriend. When he seems upset at the fact that his girlfriend took the break up very well, Jane gets suspicious of his true loyalties. Her doubts are confirmed when Ray can no longer commit to their relationship. Jane is crushed and left with no place to live. Her best friend, Liz (Marisa Tomei), comforts her and the two are filled again with anger and doubt about the opposite sex’s ability to seriously commit to a relationship.

The homeless Jane has to face Ray at work the next day. To make him jealous, she decides to move into the spare bedroom in Eddie’s apartment. Jane soon finds out about all of Eddie’s terrible sexual habits; he has a different woman stay over every night. At the same time, the two become friends and offer each other comfort from bad break-ups. As a result of Jane’s broken heart, she obsessively studies the mating habits of animals, searching for an answer to the unexplainable way that men tire of the same woman. Eddie proves to be a perfect example of the “bull” that never wants to mate with the “old cow,” but only wants a “new cow.”

Noticing Jane’s recently acquired expertise in the subject of men’s dating habits, Liz wants her to write a column for the men’s magazine where she works as an editor. Jane agrees to write under an alias. The first article is so brilliant that every talk show in the country wants the author on their program. Diane (Ellen Barkin), the star of “Diane Roberts Live,” instructs Jane to find the outspoken feminist and get her on the show. Jane now has to deal with exposing herself as a liar and telling everyone, including her boss, that she is the author of the now-famous article. As if her life were not emotionally hectic enough, Jane and Eddie begin to see each other as more than friends when they realize that both are searching for the same thing in life.

SOMEONE LIKE YOU is a great love story about two opposites finding each other when they least expect it. Ashley Judd gives a convincing performance as a woman who has been wronged by men in the past. The chemistry between Jane and Eddie is enchanting. Hugh Jackman, more commonly known as “Wolverine” from 20th Century Fox’s box-office hit X-MEN, plays a role much different from his previous character. The quality of acting in SOMEONE LIKE YOU is excellent, but is marred by plenty of foul language and Eddie’s crude sexual habits. Some moments that seemed predictable turned out to be surprising, which made the movie a pleasure to watch. SOMEONE LIKE YOU is a witty and charming movie with a fine cast of talented performers.

However, the movie has a pagan worldview with strong obscenities and profanities, sexual elements such as cows mating, a man is portrayed as a womanizer, a woman searches for diaphragm, there is implied fornication, a man touches a woman’s breasts, and a couple lies naked under covers together. Therefore, MOVIEGUIDE® recommends extreme caution.

In Brief:

SOMEONE LIKE YOU is the story of Jane Goodale, a young woman searching for success in the business world as well as romance. When Jane meets Ray Brown, the new executive producer of the show for which Jane works, she is swept off her feet. After a terrible break-up, Jane becomes determined to find the reason men can’t commit to one woman. Therefore, she studies animal mating habits. To make Ray jealous, she moves in with her co-worker, Eddie, a womanizing jerk who becomes her prime example of what she believes is the typical male. Jane’s best friend, the editor of a men’s magazine, convinces Jane to write an anonymous column. Her first article is a huge success. Jane must face telling everyone the truth when every talk show in the country, including the one for which she works, wants to showcase the article’s author. Jane begins to see Eddie as a friend and maybe something more, while realizing that there are some decent men in the world.

SOMEONE LIKE YOU is a witty, charming and well-acted comedy, but there is plenty of foul language, some immoral situations and one character has despicable sexual habits but becomes reformed.