SORORITY BOYS

Life Is a Joke – Unless You’re the Victim

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 22, 2002

Starring: Barry Watson, Harland
Williams, Michael Rosenbaum,
Melissa Sagemiller, and
Heather Matarazzo

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teens and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 85 minutes

Distributor: Touchstone Pictures/Buena
Vista (Disney)

Director: Wally Wolodarsky

Executive Producer: Michael Fottrell

Producer: Larry Brezner and Walter
Hamada

Writer: Joe Jarvis and Greg Collidge

Address Comments To:

Michael Eisner, Chairman/CEO
Buena Vista Distribution Co.
(Walt Disney Pictures, Caravan, Hollywood, Miramax, & Touchstone Pictures)
Dick Cook, Chairman
Walt Disney Pictures
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
(818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, Ro, Fe, Ho, LLL, VV, SSS, NN, A, DD, MMM) Very strong pagan, hedonistic worldview with horrible, perverted patterns of relating to, victimizing and in every way abusing peers and the opposite sex as well as extremely immature and perverted fathers depicted; nearly all choices are made from the emotion (lust or mocking) of the moment in a Romantic way; some feminist points made; boys cross dress; at least 49 obscenities and 1 profanity plus numerous instances of scatological humor; several instances of violence including shooting gun to open a lock, ugly girls continually captured in a net and tossed out of the frat house, & two guys fist-fighting in the dorm; numerous allusions to and depictions of fornication, including homosexual gags; partial and frontal female and male nudity; alcohol; drug use and smoking; misc. immorality such as betrayal, deceit, mocking, laziness, drunkenness, rude insults, stealing, disrespectfulness, and dishonoring behaviors.


Summary:

In SORORITY BOYS, three playboy college students go undercover as girls when they are banned from their frat house and are strapped for cash. With only a mild moral lesson about cultivating sensitivity, this movie is a big, pathetic package of hedonism and a promotion of practically consequence-free partying.


Review:

Dave (Barry Watson), Adam (Michael Rosenbaum) and Doofer (Harland Williams) are three playboy chauvinists belonging to the Kappa Omicron Kappa, or “KOK” fraternity, a place where drunkenness, lasciviousness, practical jokes, and vicious mocking of ugly/unwilling girls replace academic pursuits. One less endearing habit of the group comes in the form of “dog catcher,” which they scream when they find a girl in the house who is either ugly or unwilling. Then, they cover the girl with a net and toss her out onto the lawn.



The president of the morally bankrupt frat house has a grudge against Dave, so he frames him for stealing the fraternity’s money from the safe. This creates a major problem: The guys have to be in good fraternity standing by the time they all have a dinner cruise on a yacht next month because Dave’s father wants to set up Dave and his friends with a great job in his old buddy’s company. The dad’s friends are all overgrown frat boys themselves, with not an ounce of character or sincerity. They, too, like to play “dog catcher.”



The three guys come up with a solution. Since they’ve been banned from the fraternity, why not dress in drag and go to the frat’s party this weekend? This would give them a chance to sneak in, steal a video of the president having sex with someone and blackmail him into confessing his crime. The guys can then be reinstated into the group, attend the cruise and land their jobs. All goes well until the guys are caught by the dogcatcher’s net and tossed out onto the lawn of the nearby sorority house, Delta Omicron Gamma, or “DOG.” The sorority’s president feeds the “girls” and invites them to pledge.



They stay in a pink dorm room, get to know the other pledges and learn the big lesson about what it feels like to walk in a woman’s (high-heeled) shoes. All their years of judging ugly girls now come back to haunt these plus-sized, indelicate, beardy women as they reap a whirlwind of the seed they have sown. For instance, when they do sneak back into the frat house again, one of them is subjected to the “walk of shame,” a humiliating exercise where a girl trying to sneak out of a guy’s room in the morning gets taunted and photographed.



Lessons are learned as the rude frat brothers continually thwart the “girls’” plans, and their future as businessmen begins to look dimmer and dimmer. One of the guys even falls in love but cannot confess his gender. Finally, a grand football game is staged between the DOGs and another sorority with cute girls. Only the winning team will be allowed to attend the cruise with the dad’s friends.



As always, the big questions arise: Will the DOGs win the game and get the cruise invitation, ensuring the job offers? Will Dave be able to confess his true gender and true love to the president of the sorority (who happens to be confused about her own sexual orientation)? Will any of the guys find even an ounce of character inside and be able to stand up for truth or love?



With several funny lines and a few satisfying scenes about guys getting a true taste of womanhood, SORORITY BOYS is otherwise a movie basically about the perverted outlook of many college youth. The movie screams, “If it’s funny or will make you rich or feel good, why not do it?” If this movie mirrors reality in any way, then no wonder our counseling offices are filled with wounded women and angry men!



The makers of this movie would have us believe that only beautiful, strong women are worthwhile, that women are sex tools, and that life is one, big, irresponsible, consequence-free party. The mild “lesson learned” at the end is grossly over-shadowed by the hedonism portrayed in the majority of the movie. And, the fathers! The fathers are just overgrown, lusty, immature party boys – still ogling the babes and punishing the “dogs.” What a message to give our teenagers! The fruit of this thinking dishonors everyone – parents, peers and especially women.



God’s Word, on the other hand, extends an invitation for young men to seek out “a woman of excellence, whose worth is far above jewels.” The Bible offers the rewards of life and peace to those who wait on God’s timing for intimacy, who value character qualities such as “a quiet and gentle spirit” above fading, external beauty, who study to show themselves approved, and who honor their parents and bring them joy by being seekers of wisdom. SORORITY BOYS mocks all that God has painted in His Word and all He offers to His children.



While watching this movie, the Scripture, “To the pure, you show yourself pure,” came to mind. The outlook of the protagonists in SORORITY BOYS comes from hearts filled with depravity, where the world and other people seem to fit into their defiling pattern, with the expectation of perversion and evil of every sort from others.



As my friend and I left the theatre, we breathed a quick prayer that our seven-year-old boys would be spared from growing up with such a hedonistic perspective as this – all in the name of a few laughs.


In Brief:

In SORORITY BOYS, Dave, Adam and Doofer are three playboy college students belonging to the Kappa Omicron Kappa fraternity, a place where drunkenness, lasciviousness, practical jokes, and vicious mocking of ugly/unwilling girls replace academic pursuits. The frat president has a grudge against Dave, so he frames him for stealing the fraternity’s money from the safe. To get back inside, the guys dress in drag and insinuate themselves into the lives of some sorority girls, learning lessons along the way about what it feels like to walk in a woman’s shoes.



SORORITY BOYS is a movie about the perverted outlook of many college youth. The outlook of the protagonists comes from hearts filled with depravity, where the world and other people seem to fit into their defiling pattern, with the expectation of perversion and evil of every sort from others. Even worse, the fathers of these young men are just as bad as their sons. The movie’s premise screams, “If it’s funny or will make you rich or feel good, why not do it?” If this movie mirrors reality in any way, then no wonder the world is filled with wounded women and angry men