SPRING FORWARD

Falling Backward

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Ned Beatty, Live Schreiber,
Peri Gilpin, & Catherine
Kellner

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 112 minutes

Distributor: IFC Films

Director: Tom Gilroy

Executive Producer: Jonathan Sehring, Caroline
Kaplan, William Gilroy, &
Michael Stipe

Producer: Jim McKay, Tom Gilroy, Gill
Holland, & Paul Mezey

Writer: Tom Gilroy

Address Comments To:

No address available.

Content:

(RoRo, PaPa, PC, Ho, B, C, Ab, LLL, V, S, A, DD, M) Romantic worldview with discussions of New Age pagan ideas, Buddhism & the Dalai Lama, plus politically-correct, pro-homosexual content, some moral content about lending other people a helping hand, & man talks briefly about enjoyment he gets by going to Catholic mass & worshipping with other people but expresses anti-biblical, liberal ideas about religion in general; 55 mostly strong obscenities & 13 profanities, plus brief sexual talk about fornication & adultery; scene where man struggles to calm down distraught, hysterical woman who’s been beaten by her husband; no sexual scenes but brief discussion about trying to fornicate, past adultery & prostitution; little boy wears swimming trunks; alcohol use; smoking & depicted marijuana use; and, spousal abuse implied but rebuked & Boy Scouts of America defamed.

Summary:

SPRING FORWARD is a small independent movie that explores the meaning of friendship by focusing on the relationship between two co-workers, one nearing retirment and one much younger. A romantic worldview, strong foul language, some sexual talk, and some New Age and politically-correct content mar this quiet, well-acted look at the bonds of friendship.

Review:

SPRING FORWARD is a small independent movie exploring the meaning of friendship.

Ned Beatty stars as Murphy, an older parks and recreation worker in a small New England city who takes under his wing his young, new partner, Paul, played by Liev Schreiber. When Paul has trouble with his temper on his first day of the job, Murphy tries to calm and comfort the young man, whom he learns is an ex convict trying to reform his life. That day begins an ever-deepening friendship in a series of vignettes based on the change of seasons.

During the movie, Paul learns about Murphy’s sick homosexual son, and Murphy, a nominal Catholic, learns about Paul’s thirst for spirituality, which mostly leads to discussions about New Age pagan thinking, the Hindu notion of karma, Buddhism, tolerance, and the Golden Rule. A scene outside a funeral home and an encounter with a distraught, hysterical woman reinforces the last two ideas.

Although Murphy teaches Paul about the importance of lending others a helping hand, SPRING FORWARD has a romantic worldview that implies and depicts today’s false, modern notions concerning “tolerance” and spiritual pluralism. There is also a politically-correct jab against the Boy Scouts of America’s policy of not using homosexual scout leaders and a scene with depicted marijuana use. Plenty of strong foul language and brief sexual talk further mar this quiet, well-acted but overlong look at the bonds of friendship.

In Brief:

SPRING FORWARD is a small independent movie exploring the meaning of friendship. Ned Beatty stars as Murphy, an older parks and recreation worker in a New England town who takes under his wing his young, new partner, Paul, played by Liev Schreiber. Murphy lends a friendly hand to Paul, who’s an ex-convict trying to reform his life. Paul learns about Murphy’s sick homosexual son, and Murphy, a nominal Catholic, learns about Paul’s thirst for spirituality, which mostly leads to discussions about New Age pagan thinking, the Hindu notion of karma, Buddhism, tolerance, and the Golden Rule. A scene outside a funeral home and an encounter with a distraught, hysterical woman reinforces the last two ideas.

Although Murphy teaches Paul about the importance of lending others a helping hand, SPRING FORWARD has a romantic worldview that implies or depicts today’s false, modern notions concerning “tolerance” and spiritual pluralism. There is also a politically-correct jab against the Boy Scouts’ policy of not using homosexual scout leaders and a scene with depicted marijuana use. Plenty of some strong foul language and brief sexual talk further mar this quiet, well-acted but overlong look at the bonds of friendship