STEP UP REVOLUTION

Surprise Dancing

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 27, 2012

Starring: Kathryn McCormick, Ryan
Guzman, Cleopatra Coleman,
Peter Gallagher, Stephen Boss,
Misha Gabriel, Tommy Dewey,
Mia Michaels

Genre: Musical Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 97 minutes

Distributor: Summit Entertainment/Lionsgate
Films

Director: Scott Speer

Executive Producer: Jon M. Chu, Nan Morales

Producer: Erik Feig, Jennifer Gibgot,
Adam Shankman, Patrick
Wachsberger

Writer: Duane Adler, Jenny Mayer

Address Comments To:

Jon Feltheimer, CEO
Lionsgate Films AKA Lions Gate Films (Summit Entertainment/Roadside Attractions)
2700 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 449-9200 Fax: (310) 255-3870
Website: www.lionsgatefilms.com

Content:

(RoRo, ACapACap, Cap, L, V, S, N, A, M) Strong Romantic worldview where the purpose in life is to pursue your own desires, plus strong anti-capitalist elements mitigated by other pro-capitalist elements about achieving success as a dancer and winning a competition; three mild obscenities and no profanities; a brief fight between two friends; no actual sex but some passionate kissing and some of the dancing is like simulated sex; beach attire, bikinis, men in swim trunks; modest alcohol use, no drunkenness; no smoking or drugs; lying, greed, dancers intrude on public and private property to put on their surprise performances.

Summary:

STEP UP REVOLUTION is a silly story about a community fighting a greedy developer, which is used as an excuse for a series of spectacular dance numbers, that are sometimes lewd but sometimes rather classy, with little actual foul language language, actual sex and or violence. However, STEP UP REVOLUTION has a strong Romantic worldview of follow your dreams, supported by strong anti-capitalist elements.

Review:

STEP UP REVOLUTION is a silly story about a community fighting a greedy developer, used as an excuse for a series of spectacular dance numbers. The dances are sometimes lewd but sometimes rather classy, and there’s little bad language, actual sex, or violence.

The story begins with Emily, the beautiful, talented daughter of an “evil” developer. She comes to Miami with the hope of joining an exclusive dance company. Emily meets Sean, one of the organizers of “The Mob,” a street dancing group that holds surprise public performances with the hope of winning an Internet contest.

Emily’s father threatens to buy up the poor part of town – home to the dancers – and build a massive hotel/residential complex. So, “The Mob” switches its attention from performance art to protest art. Emily actually joins the group in an artistic protest against her father’s plans. Because of a misunderstanding, a portion of the group stages an uglier protest and gets disqualified from the Internet contest because of their criminal behavior. Can the error be rectified, the community saved, and the budding romance rescued by another dance?

Some of the dancing in STEP UP REVOLUTION is quite remarkable. Some is far too close to simulating sex. Also, the production values are high. There is, however, some drinking and a small amount of mild foul language. The two big problems with the movie are the strong anti-capitalist plot and virtual sermons on “You have to do what you want to in life (unless you’re a businessman).” In the real world, people do all sorts of destructive things in the name of “doing what you want.” Doing what God wants is the secret to true happiness. God will not lead you into lust, greed, envy, bitterness and depression. It’s very easy to take those paths when pursuing your own pleasure.

As for the “revolution” in the title STEP UP REVOLUTION, it’s similar to the Occupy Movement. The dancers temporarily occupy various public and private property, supposedly to make a statement in the form of a dance. The dances themselves make unclear statements, but the script provides ample explanation from the main characters. Ironically, while opposing a wealthy property developer, they themselves hope to strike it rich by getting recognized as dancing stars.

In Brief:

STEP UP REVOLUTION begins with Emily. She’s the daughter of an “evil” developer and comes to Miami with the hope of joining an exclusive dance company. She meets Sean, one of the organizers of a street dancing group called “The Mob.” The Mob holds surprise public performances with the hope of winning an Internet contest. Emily’s father threatens to buy up the poor part of town and build a massive hotel complex. So, The Mob switches its attention from flash mob performance art to protest art.

Some of the dancing in STEP UP REVOLUTION is quite remarkable. Some is far too close to having sex. There’s also some drinking and a small amount of mild foul language. The two biggest problems with the movie are the strong anti-capitalist plot and virtual sermons on “You have to do what you want to in life.” In the real world, people engage in lust, greed, envy and pride in pursuit of their own desires. God’s plan for your life is much healthier and less selfish.