SUNSHINE CLEANING

Redemption Through Suffering

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 13, 2009

Starring: Amy Adams, Emily Blunt, Alan
Arkin, Jason Spevack, Steve
Zahn, Mary Lynn Rajskub, and
Clifton Collins, Jr.

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Overture Films/Starz

Director: Christine Jeffs

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Jeb Brody, Peter Saraf, Marc
Turtletaub, and Glenn
Williamson

Writer: Megan Holley

Address Comments To:

Robert Clasen, Chairman/CEO, Starz LLC
(Starz Entertainment, Overture Films, Anchor Bay Entertainment)
8900 Liberty Circle
Englewood, CO 80112
Phone: (720) 852-7700; Fax: (720) 852-8555
Website: www.starz.com

Content:

(C, B, CapCap, PaPa, Ro, Ho, LLL, VV, SS, N, AA, DD, MM) Light Christian, redemptive worldview with some strong capitalist content, marred by some strong pagan elements and some light Romantic elements, including strong foul language, sexual references and lying as people struggle with their sinfulness, plus brief homosexual references in a subplot; 36 obscenities (including many “f” words), five strong profanities and eight light profanities, plus crude jokes about child’s illegitimate birth out of wedlock; strong, sometimes bloody images of aftermaths of violence as people commit suicide, are killed or die accidentally, plus car crashes through store window and a house burns down; depicted fornication in one scene, implied adultery, lesbian hugs another woman closely; rear male nudity, upper male nudity, and woman shown in bra a couple times or so; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking and marijuana use; and, lying justified.

Summary:

SUNSHINE CLEANING is a dark slice-of-life comedy about an unmarried mother and her quirky sister struggling to earn a living while overcoming their sinfulness and a heartbreaking family secret. SUNSHINE CLEANING is a funny, insightful character study of two sympathetic losers that ends on a redemptive note, but it contains plenty of strong foul language, sexual references and other content that merit extreme caution.

Review:

SUNSHINE CLEANING is a dark slice-of-life comedy about an unmarried mother and her quirky sister struggling to earn a living while overcoming their sinfulness and a heartbreaking family secret. The movie’s inspiring, uplifting and insightful moments don’t completely overcome its offensive elements.

The movie stars Amy Adams of ENCHANTED as Rose Lorkowski, a 33-year-old single mother working as a maid. Rose’s younger sister, Norah (played by Emily Blunt), has trouble keeping a job and is still living with their father, Joe (played by Alan Arkin), a salesman with a history of ill-fated sales schemes.

Rose’s married lover and high school sweetheart, Mac, a police detective, suggests to Rose that she go into the lucrative crime cleanup business. Rose cajoles Norah into helping her. Ironically, the messy business of cleaning up after suicides, murders and other corpses gives both sisters feelings of self-worth they never had. Challenges arise along the way, however. This pushes them to confront the personal problems and family secrets that have left them wounded and alienated from one another.

SUNSHINE CLEANING is a funny, insightful character study of two sympathetic losers. The cast, led by Amy Adams, seems to be having a lot of fun with their characters, but they know when to underscore the script’s dramatic highpoints. The story ends on a light, redemptive note that includes some positive, overt Christian references. In fact, the two sisters seem to find redemption through the suffering and comic misadventures their characters endure. Before that, however, the movie contains plenty of strong foul language, sexual references, some lying, marijuana use in one scene, and other mature subject matter (see the CONTENT section above for a summary). The movie’s redemptive aspects are poignant, but its adult content requires extreme caution.

In Brief:

SUNSHINE CLEANING is a dark slice-of-life comedy. It stars Amy Adams of ENCHANTED as Rose Lorkowski, a 33-year-old single mother working as a maid. Rose’s younger sister, Norah (played by Emily Blunt), has trouble keeping a job and is still living with their father, Joe, a salesman with a history of ill-fated sales schemes, played by Alan Arkin. Rose’s married lover and high school sweetheart, Mac, a police detective, suggests that Rose go into the lucrative crime cleanup business. Rose cajoles Norah into helping her. Ironically, the messy business of cleaning up after suicides, murders and other corpses gives both sisters feelings of self-worth they never had. Challenges arise, however. This pushes them to confront the personal problems and family secrets that have left them wounded and alienated from one another.

SUNSHINE CLEANING is a funny, insightful character study of two sympathetic losers. The movie ends on a light, redemptive note that includes some positive, overt Christian references. Before that, the movie contains plenty of strong foul language, sexual references, some lying, and other mature subject matter. The movie’s redemptive aspects are poignant, but its adult content requires extreme caution.