SUZHOU RIVER Add To My Top 10

Modern Chinese Nihilism

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Xun Zhou, Hongshen Jia, Anlian Yao, & An Nai

Genre: Mystery/Thriller/Film Noir

Audience: Adults

Rating: Not rated

Runtime: 83 minutes

Distributor: Strand Releasing

Director: Lou Ye

Executive Producer:

Producer: Philippe Bober & An Nai

Writer: Lou Ye

Address Comments To:

Jon Gerrans & Marcus Hu
Partners
Strand Releasing
1460 Fourth Street, Suite 302
Santa Monica, CA 90401
Phone: (310) 395-5002
Fax: (310) 395-2502
Email: strand@strandrel.com

Content:

(PaPa, LL, V, S, N, AA, D, MM) Nihilistic pagan worldview; 3 obscenities, 0 profanities & kidnap victim relieves herself on roof; mild film noir violence such as pushing, woman jumps off bridge, implied suicide, & distant images of two or three corpses; implied fornication; rear female nudity; alcohol use & man turns to alcohol for his only remaining comfort; smoking; and, kidnapping, smuggling & suicide.

Summary:

SUZHOU (“Su-show”) RIVER is a minor, low-budget Chinese mystery thriller about four modern-day lovers whose lives intersect in Shanghai, China. Although the story’s concept is interesting, the trick camerawork does not really work, and the scriptwriting and acting does not match the depth of the story’s obvious symbolism. There are also some sexual situations, foul language and brief nudity in SUZHOU RIVER, which ends in a nihilistic fashion.

Review:

SUZHOU (“Su-show”) RIVER is a minor, low-budget Chinese mystery thriller about four modern-day lovers whose lives intersect in Shanghai, China. The story is told by one of the men, whose face viewers never really get to see. Instead, the camera often takes the place of his eyes, much like Robert Montgomery’s 1946 movie, THE LADY IN THE LAKE, from Raymond Chandler’s detective mystery. In the Chinese movie, the narrator has an affair with a woman playing a mermaid in a water tank at a local nightclub. The woman resembles another woman who, years earlier, was kidnapped by a courier working for gangsters. The kidnapped woman disappeared, and now the courier, finally out of prison, thinks the mermaid performer is the same woman. Viewers are kept in doubt about the truth until about three-fourths through the movie, which ends tragically in a nihilistic fashion.

Most, if not all, viewers will find the pagan nihilism in this movie ultimately unsatisfying. Although the story’s basic concept is interesting, the trick camerawork does not really work, and the scriptwriting and acting does not match the depth of the story’s obvious symbolism. There are also some sexual situations, foul language and brief nudity in SUZHOU RIVER.

In Brief:

SUZHOU (“Su-show”) RIVER is a minor, low-budget Chinese mystery about four modern-day lovers whose lives intersect in Shanghai, China. The story is told by one of the men, whose face viewers never really get to see. Instead, the camera often takes the place of his eyes, much like the 946 movie, THE LADY IN THE LAKE, from Raymond Chandler’s detective mystery. In the Chinese movie, the narrator has an affair with a woman playing a mermaid in a water tank at a local nightclub. The woman resembles another woman who, years earlier, was kidnapped by a courier working for gangsters. The kidnapped woman disappeared, and now the courier, finally out of prison, thinks the mermaid performer is the same woman. Viewers are kept in doubt about the truth until about three-fourths through the movie, which ends tragically in a nihilistic fashion.

Most viewers will find the pagan nihilism in this movie ultimately unsatisfying. Although the story’s basic concept is interesting, the trick camerawork does not really work, and the scriptwriting and acting does not match the depth of the story’s obvious symbolism. There are also some sexual situations, foul language and brief nudity in SUZHOU RIVER