TABOO (GOHATTO) Add To My Top 10

Homosexual Samurai Drinking Saké

Content -4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 06, 2000

Starring: Beat Takeshi, Ryuhei Matsuda, Shinji Takeda, Masato Ibu, & Tadanobu Asano

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: Not rated

Runtime: 100 minutes

Address Comments To:

Jose Lopez, President
New Yorker Films
16 West 61st Street, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10023
(212) 247-6110

Content:

(PaPaPa, HoHoHo, VVV, SS, NN, AA, MM) Pagan worldview showing corruption of the shogunate in 1800s Japan, with ruling samurai class being perverted & destroyed by homosexuality, which is graphically portrayed in one scene, but very little Buddhism shown or discussed, except as it may relate to the samurai code; no foul language, but verbal references to homosexuality; action violence, such as sword fights, & gruesome scene where man is beheaded & head is held up; depicted scene of sodomy & other homosexual behavior plus geisha prostitutes shown; brief upper male nudity in sexual situations; alcohol use & drunkenness; and, rampant jealousy & political intrigue.

Summary:

TABOO is a Japanese movie set in the middle 1800s showing how homosexuality further corrupts Japan’s military government and its ruling samurai class. Despite, perhaps, a provocative last scene, there is no other outrage against the homosexual behavior in TABOO, which also contains a graphic beheading and an explicit sexual situation.

Review:

TABOO is a Japanese movie set in the middle 1800s. Contact with the Europeans has been made, but Japan’s military government has become even more corrupt. When a handsome, girlish, 17-year-old arrives at an important samurai school, he sets some of the other men’s hearts aflutter, leading to homosexual jealousy among the ranks. This dissension leads to a couple murders. At the end of the movie, the investigating officer, who has up to now looked on the homosexual affairs as a humorous amusement, symbolically cuts down a cherry blossom tree. His action seems to symbolize the destruction of his country.

Despite the investigating officer’s apparent symbolic action, there is no other moral outrage against the homosexual behavior in TABOO. There is also a graphic beheading scene and an explicit scene of homosexual sodomy. Thus, except possible for the photography and the acting, there is really no reason to see this movie. Of course, Jesus Christ and His apostles condemn all unlawful sexual lust and unlawful sexual behavior, including homosexuality, throughout the New Testament. God also condemns such things in the Hebrew Scriptures. More filmmakers need to take these words to heart and live by them.

In Brief:

TABOO is a Japanese movie set in the middle 1800s. Contact with the Europeans has been made, but Japan’s military government has become even more corrupt. When a handsome, girlish, 17-year-old arrives at an important samurai school, he sets some of the other men’s hearts aflutter, leading to homosexual jealousy among the ranks. This dissension leads to a couple murders. At the end of the movie, the investigating officer, who has up to now looked on the homosexual affairs as a humorous amusement, symbolically cuts down a cherry blossom tree. His action seems to symbolize his country’s destruction.

Despite the investigating officer’s apparent symbolic action, there is no other moral outrage against the homosexual behavior in TABOO. There is also a graphic beheading scene and an explicit sexual scene of homosexuality. Thus, except for the photography and the acting, there is really no reason to see this movie. Of course, Jesus Christ and His apostles condemn all unlawful sexual lust and unlawful sexual behavior, including homosexuality, throughout the New Testament. God also condemns such things in the Hebrew Scriptures. More filmmakers should take these words to heart and live by them.