TALES FROM THE HOOD Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 26, 1995

Starring: Clarence Williams III, Wings Hauser, David Alan Greer, & Corbin Bersen

Genre: Comedy/Horror

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 91 minutes

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Content:

(AB, OO, LLL, VVV, D, FR, M) Anti-biblical worldview with depictions of voodoo practices; 152 obscenities & 8 profanities; numerous incidents of murder, racially motivated violence, gang related violence, domestic violence, & violence enacted by a man awakened from the dead: drug use; and, depiction of Satan and hell.

Summary:

Spike Lee puts his mark on yet another message movie as executive producer of TALES FROM THE HOOD, a comedy/horror set in black urban America. With heavy doses of morbid humor, explicitly foul language and graphic violence, several occult tales of the lives of the newly dead are told.

Review:

Spike Lee puts his mark on yet another film as the executive producer of TALES FROM THE HOOD, a comedy/horror film set in black urban America. In it, three teens are taken on a tour of a funeral parlor by a ghoulish funeral director, and are told stories of the newly deceased: a cop; a child abuser; a sellout political advisor; and, a murderer. Each tale follows a pattern similar to that presented in the first tale: a realistic story with moral decisions evolving into a twisted horror of pain and punishment. In the end, the boys meet Satan face to face at the climax of their own horrific tale. With heavy doses of morbid humor and graphic violence, each story moves from the realistic to the fantastic and bizarre.



The movie deals with the important topics of drugs, violence and racism, but does so offensivly way by filling the air with constant obscenities and filling the screen with constant graphic violence. Typical of Lee's films, TALES delivers a message in the madness and issues a challenge: take responsibility for our actions and we can solve our problems simply by choosing to do so. This humanist solution not only denies the ultimate need for God to interact on behalf of mankind, but also trivializes its moral imperative by the humorous and trite horror genre of these tales.

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