THE BACK-UP PLAN Add To My Top 10

Brave New Family

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 23, 2010

Starring: Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin, Michaela Watkins, and Linda Lavin

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 106 minutes

Address Comments To:

Sumner Redstone, Chairman, Viacom
Leslie Moonves, CEO/President
CBS Corporation
Amy Baer, CEO, CBS Films
11800 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90025
Website: www.cbsfilms.com

Content:

(PaPa, Ro, B, LLL, V, S, NN, A, M) Strong pagan worldview endorsing sex before marriage, mixed with Romantic elements and some light moral influences stressing the value of trust and commitment; at least 25 obscenities and one profanity, including and plus several crude references to private parts and functions; mild slapstick violence such as a water fight and an extreme example of pseudo-natural childbirth, including half-clothed woman giving birth in kiddie pool, excreting blood during the process, and an obscured view of birth as it begins; several implied scenes of sex and depicted sound of sexual pleasure; rear female nudity, upper male nudity, and several shots of cleavage; light alcohol consumption; no smoking or drugs; and, disturbing breastfeeding scenes of mother and three-year-old.

Summary:

THE BACK-UP PLAN, a romantic comedy for older audiences, introduces viewers to Zoe, a single business owner worried that her biological clock is ticking down and gets artificially inseminated but then meets the man of her dreams. Despite some uneven qualities, THE BACK-UP PLAN has many humorous moments as this challenged relationship gives way to love and commitment, but it contains plenty of foul language and some implied sex scenes, so extreme caution is warranted.

Review:

HE BACK-UP PLAN, a romantic comedy for older audiences, introduces viewers to Zoe (played by Jennifer Lopez), a single woman who is worried that her biological clock is ticking down. She wants a baby and decides to be artificially inseminated, but, in an ill-timed moment, she meets Stan (played by Alex O’Loughlin), who happens to be the man of her dreams. The two play cat-and-mouse, circling each other, but eventually they realize that they’re perfect for each other; except, of course, for the fact that she is pregnant from the insemination.

This situation is complicated by Zoe’s annoying neighbor, Mona, who relates both the highs and lows of motherhood and a “Single Mothers and Proud” group that Zoe flows into and out of periodically. As Stan ponders whether or not he really wants to be involved with this pre-packaged mom, he meets a man at the playground who describes the male perspective on child raising – awful, but incredible.

Although Zoe and Stan seem destined to be together, she constantly fights it. For the most part, he carries a flame, realizing she’s the one. The big challenge for this couple is when she goes into labor. At that point, both of them have to decide if they’re willing to fight for their relationship.

As with many or most romantic comedies, performances either make it work or not. THE BACK-UP PLAN is no different. Jennifer Lopez carries the lead and shows she can work the comedy effectively. She displays a decent knack for physical comedy, whether she’s discretely stuffing her face with her beau’s stew, or in the midst of a water fight during a date-gone-wrong. Her delivery is good, but her facial reactions are better. However, the audience at the screening seemed mostly charmed by Alex O’Loughlin, who brings out a solid performance that is appealing, funny and strong.

Capably directed by Alan Poul, the movie moves at a reasonable pace, but never picks up to an engaging tempo. It could have benefited from smoother pacing and a little more time working on the performances within the primary relationship. Written by Kate Angelo, the movie is marked by engaging moments, some great set pieces, and a charm that, although uneven, is evident. The movie has some static moments, however. Nonetheless, the overall story and characters are so appealing that it works despite those moments. Also, it is inspiring that Stan shows a real and abiding love for Zoe.

Once upon a time, people met, fell in love, got married, got pregnant, and had children, but THE BACK-UP PLAN mixes that up. It reflects a different way of thinking in today’s “modern” world. Although it shows all these elements in a jumbled order, it is reflective of a postmodern mindset. To its credit, however, it also shows some of the consequential emotional fallout that comes with that.

With as many things working for it as THE BACK-UP PLAN has, it’s sad that it’s filled with as much foul language, including one profanity, one “f” word, and several crude references to private parts and functions. There are also some very questionable scenes that, although they’re unusual, are sometimes more uncomfortable or out-of-place than funny. Several of these discomfiting scenes deal with the single mothers’ group, including a three-year-old breastfeeding and an unusually painful natural childbirth scene. Regrettably, the movie’s strong pagan worldview is built on a shaky foundation presuming that sex outside of marriage is acceptable. Thus, all in all, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.

In Brief:

THE BACK-UP PLAN is a romantic comedy starring Jennifer Lopez. Once upon a time, people met, fell in love, got married, got pregnant, and had children. THE BACK-UP PLAN reflects a different way. Lopez plays Zoe, a woman worried that her biological clock is ticking down. She gets artificially inseminated, but then she meets Stan, the man of her dreams. The two play cat-and-mouse but eventually realize they’re perfect for each other. Nonetheless, Zoe resists making a final commitment. Eventually, they must decide if they’re willing to fight for their relationship.

Lopez carries the lead well in THE BACK-UP PLAN. Alex O’Loughlin as Stan is also charming. He gives a strong, appealing, funny performance. Capably directed and adequately written, the movie is marked by some engaging moments, but marred by an abundant mixture of foul language and questionable scenes. Also, the movie’s pagan worldview is based on the shaky foundation that sex outside of marriage is acceptable. To its credit, it does show some of the fallout associated with artificial insemination of unmarried women. Also, Stan really loves Zoe. The movie’s problematic content, however, warrants extreme caution for media-wise viewers.

Headline: ** Brave New Family **

Title: THE BACK UP PLAN

Quality: * * * Acceptability: -2

SUBTITLES: None

WARNING CODES:

Language: LLL

Violence: V

Sex: S

Nudity: NN

RATING: PG-13

RELEASE: April 23, 2010

TIME: 106 minutes

STARRING: Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin, Michaela Watkins, and Linda Lavin

DIRECTOR: Alan Poul

PRODUCERS: Todd Black, Jason Blumenthal and Steve Tisch

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: David J. Bloomfield and Rodney Liber

WRITER: Kate Angelo

BASED ON THE NOVEL/PLAY BY: N/A

DISTRIBUTOR: CBS Films

CONTENT: (PaPa, Ro, B, LLL, V, S, NN, A, M) Strong pagan worldview endorsing sex before marriage, mixed with Romantic elements and some light moral influences stressing the value of trust and commitment; at least 25 obscenities and one profanity, including and plus several crude references to private parts and functions; mild slapstick violence such as a water fight and an extreme example of pseudo-natural childbirth, including half-clothed woman giving birth in kiddie pool, excreting blood during the process, and an obscured view of birth as it begins; several implied scenes of sex and depicted sound of sexual pleasure; rear female nudity, upper male nudity, and several shots of cleavage; light alcohol consumption; no smoking or drugs; and, disturbing breastfeeding scenes of mother and three-year-old.

GENRE: Romantic Comedy

INTENDED AUDIENCE: Teenagers and adults

REVIEWER: Les Enloe

REVIEW: THE BACK-UP PLAN, a romantic comedy for older audiences, introduces viewers to Zoe (played by Jennifer Lopez), a single woman who is worried that her biological clock is ticking down. She wants a baby and decides to be artificially inseminated, but, in an ill-timed moment, she meets Stan (played by Alex O’Loughlin), who happens to be the man of her dreams. The two play cat-and-mouse, circling each other, but eventually they realize that they’re perfect for each other; except, of course, for the fact that she is pregnant from the insemination.

This situation is complicated by Zoe’s annoying neighbor, Mona, who relates both the highs and lows of motherhood and a “Single Mothers and Proud” group that Zoe flows into and out of periodically. As Stan ponders whether or not he really wants to be involved with this pre-packaged mom, he meets a man at the playground who describes the male perspective on child raising – awful, but incredible.

Although Zoe and Stan seem destined to be together, she constantly fights it. For the most part, he carries a flame, realizing she’s the one. The big challenge for this couple is when she goes into labor. At that point, both of them have to decide if they’re willing to fight for their relationship.

As with many or most romantic comedies, performances either make it work or not. THE BACK-UP PLAN is no different. Jennifer Lopez carries the lead and shows she can work the comedy effectively. She displays a decent knack for physical comedy, whether she’s discretely stuffing her face with her beau’s stew, or in the midst of a water fight during a date-gone-wrong. Her delivery is good, but her facial reactions are better. However, the audience at the screening seemed mostly charmed by Alex O’Loughlin, who brings out a solid performance that is appealing, funny and strong.

Capably directed by Alan Poul, the movie moves at a reasonable pace, but never picks up to an engaging tempo. It could have benefited from smoother pacing and a little more time working on the performances within the primary relationship. Written by Kate Angelo, the movie is marked by engaging moments, some great set pieces, and a charm that, although uneven, is evident. The movie has some static moments, however. Nonetheless, the overall story and characters are so appealing that it works despite those moments. Also, it is inspiring that Stan shows a real and abiding love for Zoe.

Once upon a time, people met, fell in love, got married, got pregnant, and had children, but THE BACK-UP PLAN mixes that up. It reflects a different way of thinking in today’s “modern” world. Although it shows all these elements in a jumbled order, it is reflective of a postmodern mindset. To its credit, however, it also shows some of the consequential emotional fallout that comes with that.

With as many things working for it as THE BACK-UP PLAN has, it’s sad that it’s filled with as much foul language, including one profanity, one “f” word, and several crude references to private parts and functions. There are also some very questionable scenes that, although they’re unusual, are sometimes more uncomfortable or out-of-place than funny. Several of these discomfiting scenes deal with the single mothers’ group, including a three-year-old breastfeeding and an unusually painful natural childbirth scene. Regrettably, the movie’s strong pagan worldview is built on a shaky foundation presuming that sex outside of marriage is acceptable. Thus, all in all, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.

Please address your comments to:

Sumner Redstone, Chairman, Viacom

Leslie Moonves, CEO/President

CBS Corporation

Amy Baer, CEO, CBS Films

11800 Wilshire Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90025

Website: www.cbsfilms.com

SUMMARY: THE BACK-UP PLAN, a romantic comedy for older audiences, introduces viewers to Zoe, a single business owner worried that her biological clock is ticking down and gets artificially inseminated but then meets the man of her dreams. Despite some uneven qualities, THE BACK-UP PLAN has many humorous moments as this challenged relationship gives way to love and commitment, but it contains plenty of foul language and some implied sex scenes, so extreme caution is warranted.

IN BRIEF:

THE BACK-UP PLAN is a romantic comedy starring Jennifer Lopez. Once upon a time, people met, fell in love, got married, got pregnant, and had children. THE BACK-UP PLAN reflects a different way. Lopez plays Zoe, a woman worried that her biological clock is ticking down. She gets artificially inseminated, but then she meets Stan, the man of her dreams. The two play cat-and-mouse but eventually realize they’re perfect for each other. Nonetheless, Zoe resists making a final commitment. Eventually, they must decide if they’re willing to fight for their relationship.

Lopez carries the lead well in THE BACK-UP PLAN. Alex O’Loughlin as Stan is also charming. He gives a strong, appealing, funny performance. Capably directed and adequately written, the movie is marked by some engaging moments, but marred by an abundant mixture of foul language and questionable scenes. Also, the movie’s pagan worldview is based on the shaky foundation that sex outside of marriage is acceptable. To its credit, it does show some of the fallout associated with artificial insemination of unmarried women. Also, Stan really loves Zoe. The movie’s problematic content, however, warrants extreme caution for media-wise viewers.