THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF

Myth Interpreted and Myth Guided

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 22, 2002

Starring: Samuel Le Bihan, Vincent
Cassel, Mark Dacascos, Emilie
Dequenne, & Monica Bellucci

Genre: Mystery/Action-Adventure

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 142 minutes

Distributor: Universal Focus

Director: Christophe Gans

Executive Producer:

Producer: Richard Grandpierre & Samuel
Hadida

Writer: Stephan Cabel & Christophe
Gans

Address Comments To:

Stacey Snider, Chairman
Universal Pictures
Ron Meyer, President/COO
Universal Studios
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPa, AbAbAb, FRFRFR, O, RH, L, VVV, SS, NNN, A, D, MM) Pagan worldview with strong anti-biblical & false religious elements about a creature terrorizing the French countryside; Catholic priest distorts “the will of God” & the Scriptures, commits murder & other immoral acts “for the greater good,” religion portrayed as for the gullible & the backward, American Indian spiritualism explains every human has an “animal spirit” which acts as a spirit guide, spirits “invoked” by the Indian character, & Indian remedies shown working better than Christian prayers; 5 obscenities; wolves depicted as hunted victims, cruelly shot for sport, graphically gutted, skinned & stuffed, other violence includes woman’s body repeatedly slammed on large rock, martial arts fighting, gunfighting, fighting with bow & arrow, axe, swords, chains, & knives, other scenes depict tasting of blood, arm being cut off, men burned with fire, throats cut, man tortured, man impaled & man scalped, scenes of children in imminent danger, implied maulings by creature & wolves; portrayal of incestuous desires & rape, sex with prostitutes in a brothel; cleavage, much nudity, a nude female corpse with graphic attack wounds shown; drinking; smoking; and, themes of lying, deception & vengeance.

Summary:

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF is an absurd French movie which blends history, legend, myth, and preposterous plot devices with pagan animal spirits, wolves, and a large creature roaming the countryside to tell the story of a secret sect within the church designed to upset the balance of political power in France. Amazing fight scenes, a terrific cast and breathtaking settings, BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF nevertheless is filled with images of violence, gore, nudity, Indian spiritualism, and, ultimately, anti-Christian themes.

Review:

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF is an absurd story which blends history, legend, myth, and preposterous plot devices. Brimming with beautiful scenery and stylish camerawork, it stumbles terribly as it tries to make sense out of this real 18th Century mystery. Sadly, the first half of the story is intriguing and thoroughly engaging. A military officer and his mysterious Iroquois companion, acting as emissaries of the King, investigate a series of brutal murders in the French countryside. The people, it seems, have all heard legend of a large beast which prowls through the region, ruthlessly attacking women and children. Some believe it to be a wolf while others believe it to be a supernatural demon terrorizing them. Upon examining forensic evidence, the officer concludes that this creature is no ordinary wolf and that there may be a greater conspiracy at work.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF, it turns out, is a secret sect within the church designed to upset the balance of political power in France. The valiant military officer and his martial arts-trained Indian companion are intent on uncovering the truth and bringing the evil ones to justice. Sadly, the story quickly devolves into basic elements of vengeance and gore.

By the middle of the movie, the terrifying creature had to be shown or the audience would simply lose its patience, but this is where the breakdown begins. Scenes of the mysterious creature are occasionally good, but mostly awful. The filmmakers relied heavily on the award-winning team at Jim Henson's Creatures Shop to digitally create and animate the large (not supernatural) beast. This, above many of its other flaws, contributes to the demise of the audience’s interest in the story. After all, it is difficult to be afraid of a poorly made computer effect.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF also follows in the footsteps of the latest filmmaking trends to present an historical story with contemporary elements and values. It is a clash which, if taken seriously, is, at the worst, revisionism and, at the least, terribly unconvincing as a storyline. Working past this schizophrenia, the audience audibly strains as it is asked to repeatedly suspend disbelief. Eventually, THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF collapses under the weight of its own contradictory schisms and absurdities.

Despite the ridiculous storyline and the senseless digital hindrances, THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF is superbly crafted. It has breathtaking settings, amazing and technically-enhanced fight scenes and a terrific cast, but even these things cannot save this twisted story which eventually distorts the church, the clergy and those associated with Roman Catholicism.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF is filled with images of violence, gore, nudity, Indian spiritualism, and, ultimately, anti-Christian themes. It was far more interesting when it was mythical.

In Brief:

In THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF, a military officer and his mysterious Iroquois companion, acting as emissaries of the King, investigate a series of brutal murders in the French countryside. The people have all heard the legend of a large beast which prowls through the region, ruthlessly attacking women and children. Some believe it to be a wolf while others believe it to be a supernatural demon terrorizing them. Upon examining forensic evidence, the officer concludes that this creature is no ordinary wolf and that there may be a greater conspiracy at work.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF is an absurd story blending history, legend, myth, and preposterous plot devices with pagan animal spirits, wolves, and a large creature roaming the countryside. Sadly, the first half of the story is intriguing and thoroughly engaging, but the story quickly devolves into basic elements of vengeance and gore. Despite the ridiculous storyline and other hindrances, THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE WOLF is superbly crafted with breathtaking settings, amazing fight scenes and a terrific cast. Ultimately, however, it is filled with images of violence, gore, nudity, Indian spiritualism, and anti-Christian themes. It was far more interesting when it was mythical