THE BROTHERHOOD

Peer Pressure Gone Awry

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 18, 2011

Starring: Trevor Morgan, Lou Taylor
Pucci, Jon Foster, Arlen
Escarpeta, Jesse Steccato,
Jennifer Sipes

Genre: Thriller

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 79 minutes

Distributor: Phase 4 Films

Director: Will Canon

Executive Producer: Kevin Iwashina, Chris
Ouwingat, Jamie Patricof,
Darryn Welch

Producer: Jason Croft, Steve Hein, Tim
O’Hair, Chris Pollack

Writer: Will Canon, Douglas Simon

Address Comments To:

Berry Meyerowitz, CEO/President, Phase 4 Films
20 Eglinton Avenue West
Suite 603, P.O. Box 2041
Toronto, Ontario M4R 1K8
Canada
Phone: (416) 783-8383; Fax: (416) 783-8384
Website: www.phase4films.com; Email: info@phase4films.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, B, LLL, VVV, SS, N, AAA, MMM) Generally amoral pagan worldview, with a moral decision involving honesty made at the end; nearly nonstop profanities and obscenities, with well over 100 uses of the “f” word and dozens of other obscenities and profanities; very strong violence includes gunfight results in two men getting shot, one of them is kept out of hospital for much of the film because his friends are afraid they’ll go to jail if they bring in a man with gunshot wound, wounded man is left to suffer excruciating pain and spill out lots of blood in realistic fashion because of that poor decision, pledges are asked to rob convenience stores as part of a fraternity initiation, man kidnapped and tied up to force him to do something, tied up man is punched violently and hurt severely, sorority women set fire to frat’s lawn after being crudely insulted, car crash, implied suffocation death; strong sexual content includes dialogue and one frat brother lures an obese girl into his bedroom and pretends to seduce her before sexually humiliating her before a crowd of his frat brothers; upper male nudity; alcohol use and abuse includes a fraternity pledge is locked into the trunk of a car and told to drink numerous bottles of alcohol before asking to get out, and the pledge is forgotten until next morning, when he’s found dead after choking on vomit and lacking air to breathe; no smoking or drugs; evil prank, lying, deception, racism, kidnapping, attempted extortion, and trying to deceive police.

Summary:

BROTHERHOOD is a frenetically paced, wild ride about a night where a college fraternity prank goes horribly wrong. Despite some clever twists and good performances, BROTHERHOOD has too many cheap thrills and too much bad dialogue and lewd, immoral content, including almost nonstop foul language.

Review:

BROTHERHOOD is a frenetically paced, wild, violent, foul-mouthed ride through a night where a college fraternity prank goes horribly wrong.

In the story, some fraternity pledges are expected to rob convenience store clerks to prove their manhood and obedience. One pledge, Kevin, sneaks into a store past the older frat brother who’s supposed to stop him, and a gunfight ensues with the clerk where the clerk shoots Kevin. Bleeding out and in pain, Kevin wants to go to the hospital, but the frat’s leader, Frank, overrules the reasoning and pleas of another pledge, Adam. Frank fears the police investigation that would surely follow.

Events spiral further and further out of control until Adam hatches a plan that can make everything right again, or close to it, although his plan requires all manner of deception to succeed. [SPOILER] In the end, Adam tells the police the full story anyway, choosing honesty over his potential fraternity.

BROTHERHOOD is a strange film – a deeply unpleasant exploration of some of the worst possible events that could ever transpire in a night. Its relentless energy and clever plot twists might make viewers feel that a new talent has hit the screen, in the form of Director Will Canon. The movie has too many cheap thrills and bad dialogue, however, to be really good, despite some good performances. Though Adam does the right thing at the end, media-wise viewers will find BROTHERHOOD’s lewd, immoral content excessive and unworthy.

In Brief:

In BROTHERHOOD, several fraternity pledges are expected to rob convenience store clerks to prove their manhood and obedience. One pledge, Kevin, sneaks past the older frat brother who’s supposed to stop him. A gunfight ensues with the clerk, who shoots Kevin. Bleeding and in pain, Kevin wants to go to the hospital, but the fraternity leader overrules the reasoning of another pledge, Adam. The leader fears the police investigation that would surely follow. Events spiral further and further out of control until Adam hatches a plan that can make everything right again, or close to it, but his plan requires lots of deception to succeed.

BROTHERHOOD is a strange film – a deeply unpleasant exploration of some of the worst possible events that could ever transpire in one night. Its relentless energy and clever plot twists might make viewers feel that a new talent has hit the screen, in the form of Director Will Canon. The movie has too many cheap thrills, however, to be really good, despite some good performances. Adam does the right thing in the end, but media-wise viewers will find BROTHERHOOD’s lewd, immoral content excessive and unworthy.