The Change-Up

Scatological and Schizophrenic

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 05, 2011

Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Jason Bateman,
Leslie Mann, Olivia Wilde

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 112 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures/Comcast

Director: David Dobkin

Executive Producer: Joseph M. Caracciolo, Jr.,
Jeff Kleeman, Ori Marmur,
Jonathan Komack Martin

Producer: David Dobkin, Neal H. Moritz

Writer: Jon Lucas, Scott Moore

Address Comments To:

Brian L. Roberts, Chairman/CEO/President, Comcast Corp.
Stephen Burke, CEO, NBC Universal
Ron Meyer, President/COO, Universal Studios
Adam Fogelson, Chairman, Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, HoHo, O, B, LLL, V, SSS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Very strong pagan, obscene worldview with strong homosexual reference and occult content with a magic fountain that allows the two male leads to switch bodies, with a moral, somewhat pro-family ending tacked on at the end where the two leads even thank God at one point for getting them out of the bad situation they were in; at least 80 obscenities and profanities, including frequent use of “f” words and GD, some of which is in front of children, including a young girl, plus two men relieve themselves in a fountain twice, one time of which is in a public shopping mall with people around, bathroom humor when women sits on toilet, and baby throws poo at man’s face and into his mouth; light comic violence such as woman slaps men when she thinks they spread a sexual rumor about her and girl takes man’s advice to heart about fighting back against a bully; extreme sexual content and references includes references to pornography movie being made, adulterous desires, strong homosexual reference related to porn movie, fornication, and graphic sex talk; upper female nudity in several shots; alcohol use, drunkenness and drinking while driving; marijuana use; and, strong miscellaneous immorality such as lots of lying until man confesses, bullying but rebuked, and irresponsibility but rebuked.

Summary:

In THE CHANGE-UP, an uptight, harried married man and a laid-back, pot-smoking, promiscuous loser magically switch bodies unintentionally and have to make the most of and situation. THE CHANGE-UP is the latest in this summer’s seemingly unending string of R-rated comedies, but, despite a tacked on positive message, it takes things to the most obscene extreme yet.

Review:

** Scatological and Schizophrenic **

TITLE: THE CHANGE-UP

Quality: * * Acceptability: -3

SUBTITLES: None

WARNING CODES:

Language: LLL

Violence: V

Sex: SSS

Nudity: NN

RATING: R

RELEASE: August 5, 2011

TIME: 112 minutes

STARRING: Ryan Reynolds, Jason Bateman, Leslie Mann, Olivia Wilde

DIRECTOR: David Dobkin

PRODUCERS: David Dobkin, Neal H. Moritz

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Joseph M. Caracciolo, Jr., Jeff Kleeman, Ori Marmur, Jonathan Komack Martin

WRITER: Jon Lucas, Scott Moore

BASED ON THE NOVEL/PLAY BY: N/A

DISTRIBUTOR: Universal Pictures/Comcast

CONTENT: (PaPaPa, HoHo, O, B, LLL, V, SSS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Very strong pagan, obscene worldview with strong homosexual reference and occult content with a magic fountain that allows the two male leads to switch bodies, with a moral, somewhat pro-family ending tacked on at the end where the two leads even thank God at one point for getting them out of the bad situation they were in; at least 80 obscenities and profanities, including frequent use of “f” words and GD, some of which is in front of children, including a young girl, plus two men relieve themselves in a fountain twice, one time of which is in a public shopping mall with people around, bathroom humor when women sits on toilet, and baby throws poo at man’s face and into his mouth; light comic violence such as woman slaps men when she thinks they spread a sexual rumor about her and girl takes man’s advice to heart about fighting back against a bully; extreme sexual content and references includes references to pornography movie being made, adulterous desires, strong homosexual reference related to porn movie, fornication, and graphic sex talk; upper female nudity in several shots; alcohol use, drunkenness and drinking while driving; marijuana use; and, strong miscellaneous immorality such as lots of lying until man confesses, bullying but rebuked, and irresponsibility but rebuked.

GENRE: Comedy

INTENDED AUDIENCE: Older teenagers and adults

REVIEWER: Carl Kozlowski

BRIEF REVIEW: THE CHANGE-UP is the latest in this summer’s seemingly unending string of R-rated comedies, but it takes things to the greatest extreme yet of any of these movies.

In it, two men – an uptight, harried married man named Dave (Jason Bateman) and a laid-back, pot-smoking and promiscuous loser named Mitch (Ryan Reynolds) – have been best friends since third grade. They ultimately admit they’re burned out on their lives, and, while urinating in a fountain at the same time one night, they say they’d like to trade lives – and it magically happens. They realize, however, that this is a recipe for disaster, because Dave has a massive corporate merger to complete, and Mitch is about to get his first starring role as an actor in a movie. Regrettably for them, the city of Atlanta tells them the magical fountain has been suddenly uprooted and moved, and its whereabouts won’t be known for a week.

So, Dave and Mitch realize they have to make the most of a bad situation. Mitch as Dave is forced to learn how to be a responsible family man and husband, while Dave as Mitch tries to sow his wild oats after having gotten married at a very young age.

The premise of body-switching was worn out with a slew of similar comedies back in the late ‘80s, but here the writers have found new angles for the premise by exploring mid-life crises. The problem is that the humor in the first half is non-stop scatological, with the second half also marred too often by nudity, sex jokes and foul language while it tries to deliver strongly positive, pro-family moments extolling marriage, monogamy and responsibility. Bateman and Reynolds do their jobs with unceasing energy and are impressive throughout, but the women characters are mostly treated as sex objects until they reveal their deeper emotions and intelligence too late in the movie.

Overall, THE CHANGE-UP does have laughs but is often so obscene in its pursuit of them that is often unpleasant to experience. The moral messages it finally offers are lessons any decent person should know, but ultimately THE CHANGE-UP is a movie that should be avoided if one wants to keep their mind and conscience clean.

In Brief:

In THE CHANGE-UP, an uptight, harried married man named Dave and a laid-back, pot-smoking, promiscuous loser named Mitch have been best friends since third grade. They admit they’re both burned out on their lives. While relieving themselves in a fountain at the same time one night, they say they’d like to trade lives – and it magically happens. They realize, however, that this is a recipe for disaster, because Dave has a massive corporate merger to complete, and Mitch is about to get his first starring role as movie actor. Regrettably, the magical fountain has been suddenly uprooted, and its whereabouts won’t be known for a week. So, Dave and Mitch have to make the most of a bad situation.

THE CHANGE-UP is the latest in this summer’s seemingly unending string of R-rated comedies, but it takes things to the greatest extreme yet of any of these movies. THE CHANGE-UP does have laughs but is often so obscene that it’s frequently unpleasant. The moral messages it finally offers are lessons any decent person should know, but ultimately THE CHANGE-UP should be avoided if one wants to keep their mind and conscience clean.