THE CRAFT Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
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Release Date: May 03, 1996

Starring: Robin Tunney, Fairuza Balk, Neve Campbell, & Rachel True

Genre: Occult Thriller

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures

Director: Andy Fleming

Executive Producer:

Producer: Doug Wick

Writer: Peter Filardi & Andy Fleming

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Content:

(OOO, LLL, VVV, S, A, D, M) Occult worldview commending witchcraft with clearly defined false doctrines, ancient occult teachings, New Age artifacts, & witchcraft; 31 obscenities & 10 profanities; extreme violence including man hit by car, man falling through window, woman struck by lightening, needle therapy, supernatural disfigurement, blood, furniture hits girl, explosion in shop, slitting wrists, heart attack, attempted suicide, & other grotesqueries including snakes, rats, & gruesome insects attacking people; kissing, seduction, implied oral sex, implied lesbianism & discussion of sex; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking & reference to drug use; and, revenge themes, lying, cheating, & many occult rituals & activities

Summary:

THE CRAFT is a special effects propaganda piece for occultism and witchcraft. When Sarah moves to Los Angeles, she joins three other young witches, and together, they cast spells on their enemies. This is a movie that needs to be rebuked because it will lead many impressionable children astray.

Review:

THE CRAFT is a special effects propaganda piece for occultism and witchcraft. It is a diabolical lesson in witchcraft, where the "good" witch wins in the end. When Sarah moves to Los Angeles, she is drafted into a three girl coven at her high school. By completing the fourth corner of the coven, these budding witches are able to cast spells and take revenge on their enemies. Rochelle causes the beautiful white racist to loose her hair. Sarah causes the chauvinist football hunk Chris to loose his mind over her. Bonnie gets her wish for the healing of her disfigurement. The leader Nancy invites the false-god Manon (whom she claims is older, greater and wiser than God and the Devil) into herself so that she can wreck havoc on other people.

For teenagers who seek self-affirmation and are trying to establish their identity, this movie offers the hope that occult powers can give you everything you desire. Occult incantations and rituals are presented with a respect and credibility which will cause teenagers to long for these proffered powers. Yet, this is an egocentric perspective, the self absorbed perspective of the adversary. Of course, occult powers cannot be used for good. They are evil, and this movie's promotion of them is evil. This is a movie that needs to be rebuked. It will lead many impressionable children astray.

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