THE DO-DECA-PENTATHLON Add To My Top 10

Family Bonds Overcome Sibling Rivalry

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 06, 2012

Starring: Family Bonds Overcome Sibling Rivalry

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO, News Corp.
Chase Carey, President/COO, News Corp.
Stephen Gilula, President/COO and Nancy Utley, President/COO
Fox Searchlight Pictures
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd., Bldg. 38
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000; Fax: (310) 369-2359
Website: www.foxsearchlight.com

Content:

(PaPa, RoRo, BB, C, LLL, V, N, MM) Strong mixed, or pagan, worldview with strong Romantic elements balanced by some strong moral, light redemptive points about forgiveness and the importance of family ties, but marred by excessive foul language; more than 100 obscenities and profanities; comic violence ensues when the brothers roughhouse with each other and fight when they get frustrated with the competition they have created between them; no sex scenes but some crude dialogue; upper male nudity as one brother sits shirtless in a tub while talking to his wife; no alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, verbal arguments, brothers lie to one’s spouse after she demands they stop competing with one another, and one man’s preteen son shows disrespect towards father, but the fights and disrespect are resolved in a positive fashion in the end.

Summary:

THE DO-DECA-PENTATHLON follows the exploits of two middle-aged brothers who resume an intense sibling rivalry in the form of creating their own Olympics, a 25-sport event that gives the movie its name. DO-DECA-PENTATHLON has some wise, funny, and touching moments, including a theme of forgiveness, but extreme caution is advised for excessive crude language.

Review:

THE DO-DECA-PENTATHLON is the latest low-budget, quirky movie from the brother filmmaking team of Jay and Mark Duplass, who earlier this year created JEFF, WHO LIVES AT HOME. The movie has some wise, funny, and touching moments, but these are marred by excessive foul language. That, and the strange title, will relegate the movie to poor box office.

PENTATHLON follows the exploits of two middle-aged brothers. Mark is a suburban family man, while Jeremy is a much punkier bachelor. When they were children, the brothers created their own form of the Olympics, a 25-sport event that gives the movie its name.

Because there was no definitive winner, each one has always claimed to be the victor. They now want to settle the issue of who’s the greatest brother of all time. The new contest will take place over the course of a reunion weekend celebrating Mark’s birthday. The brothers hide nearly all the events from Mark’s wife and their mother. The women are concerned that the contest will skyrocket Mark’s blood pressure and ruin his health.

As the guys find excuse after excuse to sneak around and accomplish the next surreptitious event, the movie’s pace and plotting hits comic highs. Yet, even at its most rambunctious, the movie has immense heart. The down-to-earth performances of the actors render even the most ridiculous moments richly believable.

DO-DECA-PENTATHLON has much to say under its simple surface, about the nature of competition and sibling rivalry, forgiveness, family, and even honesty. The brothers eventually learn that their mountain of seemingly simple “little white lies” can be exposed at any time as well as cause great problems. Ultimately, they find a resolution that helps everyone learn how to get along better and live with healthier attitudes. Regrettably, the movie has an excessive amount of strong foul language, which spoils the fun. Extreme caution is advised for THE DO-DECA-PENTATHLON.

In Brief:

THE DO-DECA-PENTATHLON follows the exploits of two middle-aged brothers. Mark is a suburban family man, while Jeremy is a punkier bachelor. When they were children, the brothers created their own form of the Olympics, a 25-sport event that gives the movie its name. Because there was no definitive winner, each one has always claimed to be the victor. They now want to settle the issue of who’s the greatest brother of all time. The new contest will take place over the course of a reunion weekend celebrating Mark’s birthday. The brothers hide nearly all the events from Mark’s wife and their mother. The women are concerned that the contest will skyrocket Mark’s blood pressure and ruin his health. The comedy increases as the brothers find excuse after excuse to sneak around and perform the next surreptitious event.

DO-DECA-PENTATHLON has some wise, funny, touching moments. It has much to say about the nature of sibling rivalry, forgiveness, family, and even honesty. The down-to-earth performances render even the most ridiculous moments richly believable. Regrettably, the movie contains an excessive amount of strong crude language. So, extreme caution is advised for THE DO-DECA-PENTATHLON.