THE FOG

Spiritual Confusion

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 14, 2005

Starring: Tom Welling, Maggie Grace,
Rade Sherbedgia, and Selma
Blair

Genre: Horror

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Columbia Pictures/Sony
Pictures Entertainment

Director: Rupert Wainwright

Executive Producer: Todd Garner, Dan Kolsrud and
Derek Dauchy

Producer: Debra Hill, David Foster and
John Carpenter

Writer: Cooper Layne

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment
(Columbia Pictures/TriStar/Screen Gems)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPaPa, OO, FRFR, Ab, C, B, LL, VV, SS, N, A, MM) Very strong, syncretistic pagan worldview mixes together strong occult content about ghosts and a strong implication of reincarnation, and troubled Catholic priest and Christianity are ineffectual against ghosts intent on obtaining revenge-laced justice with desires of “blood for blood,” and some slightly positive Christian elements such as one character’s sacrifice stops the ghosts and she seems to be compared to an angel, as well as some biblical elements such as references to the Book of Daniel, biblical themes of justice, the judgment of God, and the concept of the sins of the father being visited upon future generations, but placed in the context of the mixed pagan worldview; 16 obscenities, one strong profanity and four light profanities, plus woman exclaims, “Thank God!” twice when she finds that her son is safe; strong scary violence includes scary ghosts throw people through windows, drag man under the sea, turn woman to skeleton, threaten little boy, and throw man on the ground, and two women nearly drown, glass shards penetrate priest’s body, knife stabs two men in head, corpses have had their eyes sewn shut, vehicles crash into one another, and truck crashes into boat; shower scene between two unmarried people kissing and caressing, two men party with bikini-topped women on boat and implied fornication in one scene; upper male nudity and implied nudity in shower scene; alcohol use; no smoking; and, betrayal, stealing and revenge.

Summary:

In THE FOG, the ghosts of a group of lepers return more than 100 years later to exact vengeance on the descendents of an island’s town fathers who betrayed and murdered them. THE FOG is only mildly interesting. Of more concern is the movie’s endorsement of ghostly manifestations and reincarnation in an abhorrent, syncretistic pagan mishmash of spiritualism.

Review:

THE FOG is a remake of a 1980 horror movie. Although in some ways it’s better than the earlier movie, the story and characters are still not that interesting. Of more concern is the movie’s endorsement of ghostly manifestations and reincarnation in a syncretistic pagan mishmash of spiritualism.

Tom Welling, who plays Clark Kent on the WB’s television version of the Superman myth, SMALLVILLE, stars as Nick Castle, the young owner of a fishing boat on Antonio Island, Oregon. His girlfriend, Elizabeth, returns to the island from New York, just as a series of ghostly manifestations begin appearing in a strange fogbank hovering just offshore. Revenge, justice and murder seem to be on the mind of the ghosts. Nick and Elizabeth discover that the town leaders have hidden the fact that, in 1871, the town fathers built the town’s success by deceiving, stealing from and murdering a group of lepers sailing on a ship. The ghosts of the lepers have created the mysterious fog to exact revenge on the descendents of the town fathers. “Blood for blood” is the rallying cry of the ghosts.

THE FOG lacks panache and leaves too many loose ends. Its story is laced with some foul language and a shower scene between two unmarried characters who go to bed together.

Although it’s hard to take such a movie and its worldview seriously, THE FOG has a syncretistic pagan worldview that may remind those who have studied and experienced such things, of spiritualism. A spiritualist is someone who believes in ghosts and speaking with ghosts, premonitions, fortune telling, and ESP, but who may also talk about the Bible, reincarnation, angels, and even Jesus Christ. THE FOG’s worldview accepts the idea of ghosts, but reincarnation and biblical references also play an important role. For example, Elizabeth seems to be the reincarnation of the ghost leader’s dead young bride. The movie also quotes part of God’s judgment from Daniel 5 on the last Babylon king. Thus, the movie is imbued with a sense of biblical justice, but cast in a spirit of pagan syncretism and occultism. This is theologically confusing and, hence, abhorrent.

In Brief:

THE FOG is a remake of a 1980 horror movie. Nick Castle is the young owner of a fishing boat on Antonio Island, Oregon. His girlfriend, Elizabeth, returns to the island from New York, just as a series of ghostly manifestations begin appearing in a strange fogbank hovering just offshore. Nick and Elizabeth discover that the town leaders have hidden the fact that, in 1871, the town fathers built the town’s success by stealing from and murdering a group of lepers. The ghosts of the lepers have created the mysterious fog to exact revenge on the descendents of the town fathers. Elizabeth seems to be the reincarnation of the ghost leader’s murdered young bride.

Although in some ways THE FOG is better than the earlier movie, the story and characters are still not that interesting. Of more concern is the movie’s endorsement of ghostly manifestations and reincarnation in a syncretistic mishmash of pagan spiritualism. A spiritualist is someone who believes in ghosts and speaking with ghosts, premonitions, fortune telling, and ESP, but who may also talk about the Bible, reincarnation, angels, and even Jesus Christ. Such a viewpoint is abhorrent and evil.