THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET'S NEST Add To My Top 10

Letdown

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 29, 2010

Starring: Noomi Rapace, Michael Nyqvist, Lena Endre, Annika Hallin, Anders Ahlbom, Mikael Spreitz

Genre: Crime Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 148 minutes

Distributor: Music Box Films

Director: Daniel Alfredson

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Soren Staermose

Writer: Ulf Rydberg

Address Comments To:

William Schopf, President
Music Box Films
942 W. Lake Street
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 492-9364
Website: musicboxfilms.com

Content:

(RoRo, FeFe, B, LLL, VV, S, A, D, M) Strong Romantic, feminist worldview, with some moral elements concerning truth, justice and ending a sex trafficking ring; 27 or 28 obscenities (including about two or three “f” words), five strong profanities and one light profanity; strong violence with some blood includes bloody wounds, implied rape with bondage, shots of murdered people, woman nails man’s shoes to the floor with a large nail gun, man breaks policewoman’s neck, man shot in head, man points gun, threatening emails sent, young girl restrained in mental facility, man on fire, and assassination plots; implied rape and mentions of child pornography, pedophilia and sex trafficking, but nothing shown in the English language version; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, corruption, cover up and villains try to put woman in mental asylum forever to discredit her true accusations.

Summary:

THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST is the third movie in a popular Swedish mystery series, about a punk computer investigator and her reporter friend trying to stop the sex trafficking ring run by her estranged, abusive father. There are fewer objectionable elements in this third outing compared to the first two, but it is the least accomplished movie and it still has content requiring extreme caution.

Review:

THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST is the third movie in a popular Swedish mystery/crime series based on popular books published posthumously. In some ways, it is the least unacceptable of all three movies. Regrettably, however, it is also the least captivating of the three (the first one was the best). It ends the series with a whimper instead of a bang.

The story starts off with where the second movie ended, with Lisbeth Salander, a punk hacker, wounded from fighting with her evil father, a Soviet defector running a sex trafficking gang, and her oversized German half-brother, Ronald. Lisbeth and her father are taken to the hospital, but Ronald escapes, killing one policewoman in the process.

Meanwhile, the secret spy group that covered up her father’s crimes decides it has to eliminate both Lisbeth and her father before the truth of what they did comes out in public. They succeed in assassinating her evil father, but Lisbeth barely escapes.

The Stockholm police, however, charge Lisbeth with attempted murder of her father. And, the secret spy group works with the prosecutor and a pedophile psychiatrist to put Lisbeth into a mental asylum forever.

Combating this dastardly plot is Lisbeth’s reporter friend, Mikael, from the first two movies. He gets his sister, a lawyer, to defend Lisbeth while he and a special government investigative team try to bring the secret spy group to justice in time to free Lisbeth. The problem is, Lisbeth’s murderous half brother is still on the loose. He’s trying to find a way to kill Lisbeth himself before the police catch him and bring him to justice too.

As described here, this plot sounds pretty thrilling. It’s the poor, clumsy execution, however, that makes this movie much less enthralling, exciting and compelling than the first two movies. Perhaps if the running time was cut down, it might be better, but the movie’s pace often seems too slow. Making matters worse, there’s no interaction between the movie’s male and female hero until the end, and, when it comes, it’s pretty lame and uninvolving. What’s up with that? How can you not have your two stars interact with one another?

All this is really regrettable because, unlike the earlier two movies, THE GIRL WITH THE HORNET’S NEST doesn’t have the extreme sex, violence and explicit nudity of the other two movies. Thus, it’s a more acceptable viewing experience. There are brief shots, however, of Lisbeth dressed in a punk outfit, where one of her pierced earrings is a little Devil’s head. Also, this particular entry in the mystery series contains a strong Romantic worldview. Minimizing this worldview, however, is the movie’s moral theme of finding truth and justice for a woman who has been abused since she was a young girl by a system corrupted by awful sex fiends and murderers posing as respectable citizens.

MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution because of the movie’s references to crimes involving rape and sex trafficking, too much foul language, strong violence, the confused worldview, and the punk outfit with the Devil’s head. Dressing in such a punk-rock style often shows the person is in a confused, nonconformist mental state. The desire to dress like this suggests a rebellious attitude that pushes many other people away, when God would have us embrace other people so we can preach the Gospel, including helping others in need.

In Brief:

THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST is the third movie in a popular Swedish mystery series based on books published posthumously. The story begins where the second movie ended, with Lisbeth Salander, a punk hacker, wounded from fighting with her evil father, a Soviet defector running a sex trafficking gang. Lisbeth and her father are taken to the hospital, but her oversized half-brother, Ronald, escapes, killing one policewoman in the process. Meanwhile, the secret spy group that covered up her father’s crimes assassinates her father but fails to kill her. The Stockholm police charge Lisbeth with attempted murder of her father. The spy group works with the prosecutor and a pedophile psychiatrist to put Lisbeth into a mental asylum forever. Helping Lisbeth combat this dastardly plot is her reporter friend from the first two movies.

In some ways, THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST is the least unacceptable of all three movies. Regrettably, it is also the least captivating of the three. It ends the series with a whimper instead of a bang. MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution because of some mature themes, foul language, violence, and a confused worldview.