THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN

Learning to Care

Content +2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 11, 2011

Starring: Keith David, Sammi Hanratty, Brooke Shields, Aiden Quinn, Kris Kristofferson

Genre: Drama

Audience: All ages

Rating: PG

Runtime: TBD

Address Comments To:

Trevor Drinkwater, CEO, ARC Entertainment
3212 Nebraska Avenue
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 857-5200; Fax: (310) 857-5201
Website: www.arc-ent.com

Content:

(BBB, C, L, V) Very strong moral worldview rebuking the love of money, lying, selfishness, ill-gotten fame, and stressing caring for others, being a good parent, treating people kindly, with one slight reference to calling out to God in a redemptive way reflecting Christian, biblical values; three very light exclamatory profanities; girl falls off horse a couple times, food fight, pratfalls, horse falls off steep incline, girl gets knocked out riding horse under low branch, scaring parents and grandparents; very light middle school discussions of going out to dances and about relationships, horse interrupts middle school children as they almost kiss; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking or drugs; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is a beautifully made morality tale about a spoiled pre-teen girl who has to learn what’s really worthwhile in life. Though sometimes slow when the jeopardy lets up, THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is beautifully produced with a terrific cast and good direction. It’s designed for younger audiences, but adults will appreciate it too!

Review:

THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is a beautifully produced morality tale about a spoiled pre-teenage girl who has to learn what’s really worthwhile in life.

Whitney Brown is the most popular girl in her upper class school in Philadelphia. She has a bevy of friends. She makes the point that it’s not whom you know, but who knows you. Elected class president, Whitney is buying her wardrobe with her friends using her mother’s credit card when the credit is declined. Her father, Henry, comes home to announce he has lost his wealthy stockbroker job.

Everything is taken from the Brown family. All of Whitney’s society friends say they will stand by her. However, when she moves with her family to her grandfather’s rundown farm in rural Pennsylvania, she is shocked to find out that there is means of communication -- no cell phone service, no Internet and not even an old-fashioned telephone to keep in touch with her society friends.

Furthermore, her grandfather, Dusty, is nowhere to be found. Evidently, Dusty was never much of a father to Henry because he disliked responsibility.

At first, she’s scared of a horse named Bob who lives at the farm. Bob, a Gypsy Banner horse, however, is brilliant. He does tricks for Whitney and takes care of her. He takes her to school, and she learns to like him.

One day, however, Whitney embarrasses herself at her new school friends’ party. She does not know how to act in this environment. Riding home recklessly, she hits her head and gets knocked out. Bob the horse goes to a nearby farm and gets Dusty, who is managing the stable. Dusty has been in the background all the time. He brings Whitney home and slowly but surely the family reconciles.

Finally, Whitney learns what true love is – giving, not taking. In fact, it is Bob the horse who shows her what real love is.

THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is aimed specifically at a pre-teenage market. It is beautifully produced with a terrific cast and good direction. The music is delightful and very appropriate. The use of technology such as Whitney’s iPhone to tell the story is terrific. The plot, however, is a little slow in places when the jeopardy lets up. The good news is that the drama and the comedy are not campy.

There are three light exclamations to God and one light prayer, God willing. Also, Whitney almost kisses her young boyfriend but is interrupted by Bob. Both of them are a little bit too young for this type of romance.

Otherwise, the movie has a lot of strong morals. It rebukes buying your friend, love of money, selfishness, envy, lying, theft, and extols family, caring, loving others, and contentment with what life gives you.

All in all, THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is a worthwhile movie for younger audiences that will be appreciated by adults too.

In Brief:

THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is a beautifully produced morality tale about a spoiled pre-teenage girl who has to learn what’s really worthwhile in life. Whitney Brown’s father loses his well-paying stockbroker’s job. So, her family has to move to move to her grandfather’s rundown farm in rural Pennsylvania, with no cell phone service, no Internet and not even an old-fashioned telephone. Whitney is like a rich fish out of water. With help from a cantankerous but smart horse named Bob, Whitney learns what true love is – giving, not taking.

THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is aimed specifically at a pre-teenage market. It is beautifully produced with a terrific cast and good direction. The music is delightful and very appropriate. The use of technology such as Whitney’s iPhone to tell the story is terrific. The plot, however, is a little slow in places when the jeopardy lets up. The good news is that the drama and the comedy are not campy. All in all, THE GREENING OF WHITNEY BROWN is a worthwhile movie with very strong moral values. It’s designed for younger audiences, but adults will appreciate it too!