THE INVISIBLE CIRCUS Add To My Top 10

Idealism Without Foundations

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 02, 2001

Starring: Cameron Diaz, Jordana Brewster, Christopher Eccleston & Blythe Danner

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 92 minutes

Address Comments To:

Mark Ordesky, President
Fine Line Features
Robert Shaye, CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 854-1453
Web Page: www.flf.com

Content:

(RoRoRo, CoCoCo, APAP, Acap, HH, Ab, B, C, LL, VV, SS, NN, A, DD, M) Romantic, idealistic worldview of the 1960s hippie generation, depicted in rebellious, communal, promiscuous, anti-war, anti-American behaviors & actions ruled by the relative ideals of the heart; many humanistic elements with strong communistic tone; a couple of neutral Catholic references & a scene of praying in church; about 12 obscenities & one or two profanities; moderate violence with rough street scenes & blast from terrorists that kills an innocent man; several scenes of slightly veiled sex; some upper female nudity & rear male nudity; alcohol, smoking & drug use & abuse; and, miscellaneous immorality such as lying, stealing, rebellion, & terrorism.

Summary:

In THE INVIISIBLE CIRCUS, a teenage girl travels to Paris in the 1970’s to find out about her sister’s suicide, and in the meantime falls in love with her dead sister’s boyfriend. Wrought with overt communism and idealism without absolute truth, this movie is a sad and not-too-entertaining commentary on the wages of sin - which leads to death.

Review:

THE INVISIBLE CIRCUS is a film about the hippie generation and their poor, lost souls of the 1960s and 1970s, “the invisible circus.” It is the story of teenage Phoebe, who travels to Europe in the mid-1970s to find out about her sister’s suicide in 1969. The details of her sister’s mysterious disappearance, as well as the memories and influence of her sister Faith have haunted Phoebe for years, and she states, “It’s funny how people have more power over you when they’re not really there.”

Phoebe’s dad had died nine years ago from Leukemia, though Phoebe and Faith had blamed the company where he worked for killing him. The father was actually an artist, they said, and he was being slowly killed by corporate America. The father favored Faith over Phoebe and his wife, Gail, and Faith was devastated when he died, vowing to take over and surpass his idealistic ways.

Told in narrative, Phoebe brings her dead sister’s old postcards with her to Europe, to more closely follow the trail of clues. There is a flashback of Faith praying in a church. She writes on her post card, “Everything seemed connected for a moment . . . Transcendently Yours, Faith.”

Phoebe travels to France, where she finds Wolf, Faith’s old boyfriend, now called a boring, un-hippie name like Christopher. Wolf tells her that Faith joined an underground political group when the U.S. invaded Cambodia. She had partaken in disruptions of political gatherings to get back at America for “napalming” children in Viet Nam. Wolf tells Phoebe about Faith, “To hold her edge, she always had to go further and further out .... She thought she was changing the world, but in the end, she was just one more person looking for kicks.”

After taking some LSD on the street, to get a better sense of what her sister had been feeling, Phoebe sees a vision of Faith, who is beckoning her toward her own violent and rebellious ways. After the bad acid trip, Phoebe tosses Faith’s post cards over a bridge. Wolf rescues her, and the two take off to Portugal, where Faith’s body had been found. Wolf continues to tell Phoebe of Faith’s adventures, including a stint with the “Red Army,” where she became a revolutionary/terrorist in Berlin and killed a man.

Slowly, Wolf admits he has been lying about his involvement in Faith’s affairs, which was actually quite substantial. Phoebe is smitten by the memory of her sister, though, and she falls for Wolf. The two of them have numerous lovemaking sessions on their journey to “truth.”

THE INVISIBLE CIRCUS is a catchy title for a long, tedious movie. It is the story of how much of our culture lived in the hippie era, though, with a strong idealism not grounded in the absolute truths of the Word of God. One interesting pattern was that Faith had judged corporate America for killing her father, and she ended up killing an innocent man in a German corporation. The Word of God says, “In the same manner you judge, you will be judged.”

The end of idealistic, humanistic, communistic, carnal man is death. If you don’t already know that principle, this movie will preach it well. MOVIEGUIDE® would strongly suggest, however, saving your hard-earned box office dollars for more worthy fare.

In Brief:

THE INVISIBLE CIRCUS is the story of teenage Phoebe, who travels to Europe in the mid-1970’s to find out about her sister’s suicide. In France, she finds Wolf, Faith’s old boyfriend, who tells her that Faith joined an underground political group when the U.S. invaded Cambodia. She had partaken in disruptions of political gatherings to get back at America for “napalming” children in Viet Nam, and she had joined the “Red Army,” where she had killed a man. Wolf tells Phoebe about Faith, “She thought she was changing the world, but in the end, she was just one more person looking for kicks.” Slowly, Wolf admits he has been lying about his involvement in Faith’s affairs, which was actually quite substantial. Phoebe is smitten by the memory of her sister, though, and she falls for Wolf. The two of them have numerous lovemaking sessions on their journey to “truth.”

THE INVISIBLE CIRCUS is a catchy title for a long, tedious movie with strong pro-Communist sentiments. It is the story of how much of our culture lived in the hippie era, pursuing a strong idealism not grounded in the absolute truths of the Word of God