THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 27, 1993

Starring: Mel Gibson & Nick Stahl

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: Warner Brothers

Director: Mel Gibson

Executive Producer:

Producer: EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: Bruce
Davey

Writer: Malcolm MacRury BASED ON NOVEL
BY: Isabelle Holland

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, LL, V, S, A/D, M) Biblical principles of grace, mercy, forgiveness, trust, and friendship; 15 obscenities, 4 profanities & 12 crudities; brief violence in form of verbal arguments; implied promiscuity & teenage couple interrupted in bed, but no nudity shown; young boys are offered beer by a parent and smoke cigarettes; and, boy lies frequently, but character is redeemed by film's end.

Summary:

THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE offers bitter-sweet lessons in the tender mercies of injustice as it tells about two misfits, a 12-year-old, troubled, fatherless boy (Nick Stahl) and a mysterious recluse (Mel Gibson), and the relationship that develops as they help each other cope with overwhelming and painful circumstances. THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE is a touching and powerful story of trust, mercy and unconditional friendship between two unlikely candidates, regrettably marred by unnecessary foul language.

Review:

Lessons in the tender mercies of injustice--a descriptive phrase from the film THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE--tells much about this bitter-sweet drama involving the lives of two misfits and the relationship that develops as they help each other cope with overwhelming and painful circumstances. 12-year-old Nick Stahl is a troubled, fatherless boy who befriends mysterious recluse Mel Gibson and finds the first real friend he has ever had.

THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE is a touching and powerful story of trust, mercy and unconditional friendship between two unlikely candidates. Mel Gibson excels in his dual role of directing and acting, as he successfully sets the mood for this drama and carries it through while on screen. 12-year-old Nick Stahl turns in possibly the best performance of any of the current crop of big-picture "child actors." He is believable, natural and convincing in his role as Chuck Norstadt. The photography is very good, the music, while not memorable, is pleasing and appropriate and the supporting cast members are all excellent. The only real drawback is, as usual, the unnecessarily foul language--most of which is spoken by young Chuck. When will they learn? Without the language, this would be an excellent, heart-warming and entertaining movie.

In Brief: