THE SANTA CLAUSE 3: THE ESCAPE CLAUSE

Use the Escape Clause

Content +1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 03, 2006

Starring: Tim Allen, Martin Short, Elizabeth Mitchell, Judge Reinhold, Liliana Mumy, Ann Margaret, Eric Lloyd, and Spencer Breslin

Genre: Comedy

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: : ** Use the Escape Clause **

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO
The Walt Disney Company
(Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, Hollywood Pictures, and Buena Vista Distribution)
Dick Cook, Chairman
The Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(BB, FR, Pa, Ab, V, M) Ultimately strong moral worldview about Santa Claus with good battling evil and some biblical principles extolled set in a mythical world with some false religious and pagan elements, but no mention of the real reason for the season, Jesus Christ, plus pagan worldview as antagonist seeks fame and fortune at any cost but ultimately rebuked; no foul language, but some light crude humor as reindeer make jokes about passing gas; mild violence as Jack Frost deviously wreaks havoc in Santa’s Workshop, a tree falls over, minor explosions, little girl threatened, and mother and father are frozen; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, antagonist's willingness to lie, cheat and hurt anyone in order to gain fame and fortune is rebuked.

Summary:

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3: THE ESCAPE CLAUSE stars comedian Tim Allen, who reprises his role as Santa Claus, who must deal with a greedy Jack Frost and a pregnant wife. THE SANTA CLAUSE 3 is a somewhat lackluster slapstick comedy made for children and families, with some positive moral elements, but it makes no mention of Jesus Christ, the real reason for the Christmas season.

Review:

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3: THE ESCAPE CLAUSE stars comedian Tim Allen, who reprises his role as Santa Claus. In the first two movies, Tim Allen becomes Santa Claus and then subsequently needs to find a wife in the sequel. In THE SANTA CLAUSE 3, Santa’s wife (Elizabeth Mitchell) is pregnant and near delivery. Unfortunately, her due date coincides with Christmas, and Santa struggles between his duties in delivering toys to the world’s children and being a supportive husband and father. Jack Frost, played by funnyman Martin Short, enters the scene looking for his due billing amidst the legendary characters of pagan mythology, like Father Time, Mother Nature, Cupid, and the Easter Bunny. A council meeting of legendary figures is called to deal with the antics of Jack Frost, who has broken some of the rules. Jack pleads with Santa to give him a chance to help and learn from him. Santa relents and allows Jack to come alongside him as he prepares for Christmas.

Jack Frost learns of a way to turn back Time and take the role of Santa, along with the fame that goes with it. He just needs to get Santa to wish that he had never become Santa. Frost creates havoc in Santa’s workshop, manipulating elves and creating doubt in the mind of Santa's family. As a side plot, Mrs. Claus is lonely and wants to share her pregnancy and birth with “tall people.” So, in order to appease his wife, Santa finds a way to bring them to the North Pole. He has to pretend, however that he is a toymaker in Canada. All this leads to mayhem as Santa tries to set everything right.

Frost succeeds in turning back Time and becoming Santa. Tim Allen returns to life as it would have been had he not become Santa. Meanwhile, the impact of giving in to our baser instincts is shown as Frost’s greed, selfishness and pagan attitude impacts the world.

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3 is a slapstick comedy, made for children and families. The plot is ill defined and hard to follow at times. Martin Short is a great comedian and hysterical at times, but has some real creepy moments in this film. Too much time is taken in the beginning setting up the plot, which leads to a rushed resolution of plot conflict. Santa is depicted as a well-intentioned savior figure, and the world responds to his lead. This movie, however, makes no mention of the true meaning of Christmas and exaggerates the role of Santa Clause in our world. While Santa exudes goodness and the importance of self-sacrifice and non-pagan views, no mention is made to where goodness and love come from God.

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3 does strongly depict the need for a father, which is often not present in today’s media. Santa wants to get it right with his family this time, and the film shows restored and positive relationship with both his son and his extended family.

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3 is a funny movie, but has some creepy elements. It is clearly a sequel, not as good as THE SANTA CLAUSE and hopefully will be the last in its run. The movie has some plot problems and can be really corny at times, but with no language, and limited violence with no one really getting hurt, it is a silly movie that kids will probably enjoy. It will be important, however, to discuss the true meaning of Christmas in the Christ child as well. As we all should know by now, Jesus Christ is the real reason for the season.

In Brief:

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3: THE ESCAPE CLAUSE stars comedian Tim Allen, who reprises his role as Santa Claus. Santa’s wife is pregnant and near delivery. Unfortunately, her due date coincides with Christmas, and Santa struggles between his duties in delivering toys to the world’s children and being a supportive husband and father. Meanwhile, Jack Frost, played by funnyman Martin Short, enters the scene. Jack learns of a way to turn back Time and take the role of Santa, along with the fame that goes with it. All this leads to mayhem as Santa tries to set everything all right.

THE SANTA CLAUSE 3 is a slapstick comedy made for children and families. The plot is ill defined and hard to keep up with at times. Martin Short is a great comedian and hysterical at times, but has some real creepy moments in this film. Too much time is taken in the beginning setting up the plot, which leads to a rushed resolution of plot conflict. Although the movie extols some positive moral, biblical principles and contains few objectionable elements, it makes no mention of Jesus Christ, the real reason for the Christmas season.