THE SAPPHIRES

Singing Sensation

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 22, 2013

Starring: Chris O’Dowd, Deborah
Mailman, Jessica Mauboy,

Genre: Musical Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 103 minutes

Distributor: The Weinstein Company

Director: Wayne Blair

Executive Producer: Ben Grant, Soon Kie Lee, John
Sim, Tristan Whalley

Producer: Kylie Du Fresne, Rosemary
Blight

Writer: Tony Briggs, Keith Thompson

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein, Co-Chairmen, The Weinstein Company (Radius-TWC/Dimension Films)

345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor

New York, NY  10014

Phone:  (646) 862-3400; Fax:  (917) 368-7000

Website:  www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(Pa, Ro, B, P, LL, VV, S, NN, AA, DD, M) Mixed pagan worldview with Romantic, moral, and patriotic elements, including some content commending family; Pagan prayers; honoring family; 14 obscenities, four profanities; violence due to depictions of the Vietnam war including gun shots and shooting, man who isn’t a soldier gets shot and hurt, man hits other man in the face, woman slaps man; implied sex out of wedlock, child out of wedlock, implied affair, and some sexual commentary; brief picture of naked girls, upper male nudity, women in short dresses, man in underwear; drinking and drunkenness; smoking and drug use; and, lying and racism.

Summary:

THE SAPPHIRES is about four Australian aborigine girls who create a singing group that goes to Vietnam to entertain American soldiers. With laughs and tears, the entertaining SAPPHIRES has a mixed worldview with Romantic, moral, and patriotic elements, including some foul language, pro-family elements, and an implied affair that produces a child out of wedlock.

Review:

During the war in Vietnam, four Australian Aboriginal girls join a singing group to entertain American soldiers, in THE SAPPHIRES. With laughs and tears, THE SAPPHIRES has a romantic worldview but also commends family, though it does have some lewd elements.



Living in the Australian outback, three black aborigine sisters, Gail, Julie, and Cynthia, and a cousin, Kay, form an all girl band and entertain their whole community. When the girls get older, they long to be able to sing and perform in front of all types of audiences. However, society looks down upon the aboriginal community. So, when the three sisters go into the town center to audition, they are kicked out for being black, even though they have great talent.



They aren’t the only ones kicked out. Dave, a piano player, stood up for the girls and was also kicked out. Seeing the potential in the sisters, he tells them he will be their manager. The youngest sister, Julie, has a great desire to be on stage and has the voice for it, so she convinces the sisters and Dave to go and audition to entertain soldiers in Vietnam. Bringing their cousin into the group, the girls start to practice. Dave convinces the girls they need to sing soul rather then country music. Changing their show up a little, the girls are hired and start to perform for the soldiers immediately.



Each of the girls has a different love interest, but the soldiers are all married. They continue to sing in different areas of the war and sometimes in very dangerous situations. One day a huge attack occurs near them. Who will survive?



THE SAPPHIRES is a warm-hearted movie that will make audiences cry and laugh at the same time. Each of the main female actresses has wonderful voices and it is delightful when they sing. THE SAPPHIRES also portrays issues of racism in the 60s in Australia, that’s interesting and unique. Overall, the movie is cute and entertaining.



THE SAPPHIRES shows the importance of family staying with each other and supporting each other in their dreams. However, there are some cautionary elements of implied affairs and a child out of wedlock. There are also some drug references. All this gives the movie a mixed worldview. So, strong caution is advised for THE SAPPHIRES.

In Brief:

THE SAPPHIRES is about four Australian aborigine girls in 1968, who create a singing group that goes to Vietnam to entertain American soldiers. Sisters Gail, Julie, and Cynthia, and their cousin, Kay, decide to entertain American soldiers in Vietnam. With the help of their sympathetic white manager, they become a big success. Especially when he convinces them to sing soul music instead of country. They continue to sing in different areas of the war zone, sometimes in very dangerous situations. One day, a huge attack occurs near them. Who will survive?

THE SAPPHIRES is a warm-hearted movie that will make viewers cry and laugh at the same time. Each actress has a wonderful voice, and it’s delightful when they sing. THE SAPPHIRES shows the importance of family staying with each other and supporting one another’s dreams. It also portrays some interesting, unique situations about Australian culture. However, there is some foul language, dangerous situations and implied affairs with a child out of wedlock. There are also some drug references. All this gives THE SAPPHIRES a mixed worldview, so strong caution is advised.