THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP

Lost in Dreamland

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 22, 2006

Starring: Gael García Bernal, Charlotte
Gainsbourg, Alain Chabat,
Miou-Miou, and Emma de Caunes

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 106 minutes

Distributor: Warner Independent Pictures

Director: Michel Gondry

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Georges Bermann

Writer: Michel Gondry

Address Comments To:

Mark Gill, President
Warner Independent Pictures
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
(A Time Warner company)
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: wip.warnerbros.com

Content:

(Ro, B, LLL, V, SS, NNN, A, D, M) Godless Romantic worldview where people seek only to fulfill their personal desires, but with a light moral premise that provides an implied warning to those people who daydream too much and live in a fantasy world; 32 obscenities (including some "f" words) and one light exclamatory profanity; light comic violence includes man falls out of bed and man is angry in one dream sequence where he throws some objects; strong sexual references, such as frank talk and crude jokes about sex, including older man gives crude sexual advice to younger man having trouble with his love life; upper female nudity in one scene and full male nudity in another scene; alcohol use; smoking; and, miscellaneous immorality and problems such as lying, man sneaks into woman's apartment where he snoops briefly around and takes a cherished toy from her mantle to fix it, and character mentions pagan feng shui practice.

Summary:

THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP is a unique French comedy with much dialogue in English, about a whimsical Mexican artist in Paris with his head in the clouds who becomes enamored by the English girl in the apartment across the hall. This movie has a playful quality that is very entertaining, especially in the whimsical dream sequences, but the rest of the movie contains strong foul language, frank and crude talk about sex, and brief nudity in two scenes.

Review:

THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP is a French movie with, however, much dialogue in English. It is a lyrical comedy for mature audiences with many funny, creative and beautifully done dream sequences.

Mexican actor Gael García Bernal stars in the movie as Stephane Miroux, an eccentric young man born to a French mother and a Mexican father. Stephane has always had trouble separating fantasy from reality. Asleep, he is the charismatic host of "Stephane TV," where he hilariously expounds on "The Science of Sleep" while people and situations from his life appear. In real life, Stephane has a boring job (that his mother got for him after his father's death) at a calendar publisher in Paris.

Stephane pines for Stephanie, the English girl in the apartment across the hall, but he doesn't know how to woo her. He gets advice from his crude co-worker, Guy.

Stephanie is initially charmed by Stephane. Stephanie shares Stephane's love for handcrafting whimsical objects. They often speak in English because Stephane's French is very bad, and Stephanie doesn't know much Spanish. Stephanie grows increasingly perplexed by Stephane's shy behavior, not to mention his childishness and shaky connection to reality. Meanwhile, Stephane searches for the way to her heart in his crazy, lyrical, humorous dreams and artistic creations, which include bizarre images of the office he loathes.

The dream sequences and art in THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP are very funny and often lyrically beautiful. They frequently consist of hand-crafted backdrops and whimsical designs and toys. Ultimately, the story in THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP is tragic because Stephane is so lost in his own dreams and in his art that he can no longer relate to real people. Thus, he remains a lonely, isolated child at the end.

THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP has a playful quality that is very entertaining, especially in the dream sequences and the fantasy creations that Stephane and Stephanie use and ponder. The rest of the movie, however, contains strong foul language, frank and crude talk about sex, and brief nudity in two scenes. The characters in this story are mostly interested in improving their love lives and their careers. The story offers an implied warning, however, to those people who daydream too much and live in a fantasy world.

In Brief:

THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP is a unique French comedy with, however, much dialogue in English. Mexican actor Gael García Bernal stars as Stephane Miroux, an eccentric young man born to a French mother and a Mexican father. Stephane has always had trouble separating fantasy from reality. While sleeping, he is the charismatic host of "Stephane TV," where he hilariously expounds on "The Science of Sleep." In real life, Stephane has a boring job at a calendar publisher in Paris that his French mother got for him after his father's death. Stephane pines for Stephanie, the English girl in the apartment across the hall, but he doesn't know how to woo her. He searches for the way to her heart in his crazy, lyrical, humorous dreams and art.

The dream sequences in THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP are very funny and often lyrically beautiful. They frequently consist of hand-crafted, whimsical designs and toys. The movie has a playful quality that is very entertaining, especially in those dream sequences and Stephane's goofy artistic creations. The rest of the movie, however, contains strong foul language, crude talk about sex, and brief nudity in two scenes.