THE WAR AT HOME

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 22, 1996

Starring: Kathy Bates, Martin Sheen,
Kimberly Williams, Emilio
Estevez , & Carla Gugion

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 118 minutes

Distributor: Touchstone Pictures/Walt
Disney Company/ Buena Vista
Pictures Distribution

Director: Emilio Estevez EXECUTIVE
PRODUCER: Tracie Graham-Rice

Executive Producer:

Producer: Tracie Graham-Rice PRODUCER:
Emilio Estevez, Brad Krevey,
Steve Stabler, & James Duff

Writer: James Duff

Address Comments To:

Content:

(C, LLL, VV, S, A) Mild Christian worldview where mother quotes scripture & sings hymns with family struggling over Vietnam war; 30 obscenities & 5 profanities; war scenes with bloodshed & execution, hitting,, & threats with gun; implied fornication; alcohol use, and, verbal threats

Summary:

THE WAR AT HOME documents the pain and frustration of a Vietnam vet who returns home and discovers that no one understands his world. Painful to watch, it is a powerful movie directed by Emilio Estevez. Containing violence, images of war, verbal abuse, and fierce arguments, it is for adults only.

Review:

Returning from the Vietnam War brings emotional upheaval to even the most idealistic families. Keeping up appearances is foremost in the Collier family, creating THE WAR AT HOME. Having recently returned from the war as an honored vet, Jeremy notices a turning point for all his family members during this Thanksgiving celebration. Jeremy is not the same person he was when he left for the war. He has returned with memories which haunt his inmost being. His family has no frame of reference to understand what he has experienced, and invariably they attempt to placate him. Dumped by his girlfriend, Jeremy spins into a deeper into his world of self pity.

Director Emilio Estevez addresses flaws in the fabric of families. THE WAR AT HOME responds to what many Vietnam vets experienced upon their return. The film is agonizing. It shows how so much bitterness and hatred can be pent up in one individual for so long. The unregenerate nature of the film exposes the need for forgiveness to receive liberation from the past. Although pity is felt for the antagonist, fault is found with each character. Each party has contributing flaws. Filled with angst, obscenities, images of war, and horror, it is a powerful and disturbing film.

In Brief: