THE YOUNG VICTORIA

The Love of a Lifetime

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 18, 2009

Starring: Emily Blunt, Rupert Friend,
Paul Bettany, Miranda
Richardson, Mark Strong, Jim
Broadbent, Jeanette Hain, and
Harriet Walter

Genre: Historical Drama

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Apparition

Director: Jean-Mark Vallée

Executive Producer: Colin Vaines

Producer: Graham King, Martin Scorsese,
Tim Headington, and Sarah
Ferguson

Writer: Julian Fellowes

Address Comments To:

Bob Berney and Bill Pohlad
Apparition
25 West 39th Street
New York, NY 10018
Phone: (646) 257-2800
Website: www.apparition.com
Email: contact@apparition.com

Content:

(C, BB, L, V, S, AA, B, M) Light Christian worldview with strong moral elements that could have been stronger and more overt throughout the movie; one “d” word; light violence includes man roughly handles older teenager who refuses to do his will and shoves her against a couch, man is wounded in shoulder with some blood showing, and assassin shoots at two people; implied marital sex during honeymoon includes passionate kissing shown, light kissing, clothed married couple lying in bed together, and woman moves on top of her husband in bed to kiss him tenderly but they have their bedclothes on and camera shows nothing else; no nudity; alcohol use and man seems to be drunk; brief smoking; and, political scheming, married couple has one argument, and high family tension between king and his sister-in-law over his niece, who will be the future queen when he dies.

Summary:

THE YOUNG VICTORIA is about the first few years of the Queen Victoria’s long reign in England during the 1800s, including her relationship and eventual marriage to the loving, dashing, and wise Prince Albert. YOUNG VICTORIA is a good movie with a positive Christian, moral view of romance and marriage.

Review:

THE YOUNG VICTORIA is a historical drama about the first few years of the Queen Victoria’s long reign in England during the 1800s, including her relationship with the object of her affection, her husband Prince Albert of Germany. It is a very good movie, but it could have been better. Its positive worldview also could have been stronger and more overt rather than just mostly implied.

The movie begins with a shot of Queen Victoria’s coronation at Westminster Abbey on June 28, 1838. It then jumps back in time to two years before, with her uncle, William IV, still on the throne. Victoria is next in line to the throne, but her mother, and her mother’s power hungry advisor and supposed lover, have kept her sheltered from politics and court intrigue, so they can control her when she becomes Queen.

Into this situation steps the dashing Prince Albert, from two duchies in Germany, who comes for a visit to England. Albert’s own uncle, King Leopold of Belgium, envisions a marriage between Albert and the future Queen. Happily, Albert and Victoria are immediately attracted to one another, and begin a correspondence when Albert returns to Germany.

When Victoria becomes Queen, however, she names England’s handsome Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne (“Mel-born”), her political advisor. Melbourne advises her well until he loses an election, and Victoria reacts coldly to the new Prime Minister. Her reaction insults the new Prime Minister, who resigns. This raises the people against her, but Albert’s letters show her how much she needs his sage advice to get out of this jam.

Victoria invites Albert to her side and invites him to marry her. All seems well for a while, but Victoria begins to resent Albert’s interest in the day’s politics. She wants to run things by herself! Only Albert’s sacrificial love for Victoria can overcome her resentment.

THE YOUNG VICTORIA is part political intrigue and part romantic drama. The character motivations regarding the political intrigue are sometimes hard to follow, so viewers have to pay careful attention to what’s occurring in the plot. The romantic drama between Queen Victoria and Prince Albert is easier to follow, partly because the growing affection between them shows clearly in the appealing performances of Emily Blunt as Victoria and Rupert Friend as Albert. Thus, by the end of the movie, you will be rooting for this young couple as they iron out their differences and figure out a way to rise above the political intrigue that threatens to tear them and the country apart.

If the political intrigue in the movie were handled a little better, THE YOUNG VICTORIA would be a truly great movie. Also, the movie downplays the Christian worldview that underpinned England at that time. Thus, the movie’s Christian worldview is light and implied rather than really strong and overt.

There are some bedroom scenes between Victoria and Albert after they get married, so MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for pre-teenagers. The scenes are light or implied, however, so this is a movie that contains a strong biblical, moral view of marriage. By all accounts, the movie’s depiction of the strong love between Queen Victoria and her husband deserves to be called one of the greatest love stories in history. After Prince Albert’s death, Victoria appeared publicly only in mourning and even laid out his clothes daily in loving memory for the rest of her days.

In Brief:

THE YOUNG VICTORIA is about the first few years of the Queen Victoria’s long reign in England during the 1800s. The movie begins with a shot of Queen Victoria’s coronation at Westminster Abbey on June 28, 1838. It then jumps back in time to two years before, with her uncle, William IV, still on the throne. Victoria is next in line to the throne, but her mother, and her mother’s power hungry advisor and supposed lover, have kept her sheltered from politics and court intrigue, so they can control her when she becomes Queen. Into this situation steps the dashing Prince Albert, from two duchies in Germany. Albert’s sacrificial love, sage advice and their enduring affection helps Victoria become one of the most successful monarchs in England’s history.

THE YOUNG VICTORIA is part political intrigue and part romantic drama. The character motivations regarding the political intrigue are necessarily complex, so please pay close attention. The romantic drama between Queen Victoria and Prince Albert is easier to follow and makes the movie compelling and inspiring. There are some very mild bedroom scenes between the married couple, so MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for pre-teenagers.