TOY STORY IN 3D

A Timeless Classic Comes to Life Again

Content +3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 22, 1995

Starring: HE VOICES OF: Tom Hanks, Tim
Allen, Don Rickles, Wallace
Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Jim
Varney, Annie Potts, Laurie
Metcalf, R. Lee Ermey, John
Morris, and Erik von Detten

Genre: Animated/Comedy/Fantasy

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: 81 minutes

Distributor: Pixar/Walt Disney
Pictures/Walt Disney Company

Director: John Lasseter

Executive Producer: Steve Jobs and Edwin Catmull

Producer: Bonnie Arnold and Ralph
Guggenheim

Writer: Joss Wheldon, Andrew Stanton,
Joel Cohen, and Alex Sokolow

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO
The Walt Disney Company
(Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, Hollywood Pictures, Miramax Films, and Buena Vista Distribution)
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(CC, BBB, V, M) Strong Christian worldview with very strong moral elements where friendship and forgiveness triumph over envy and adversity; no obscenities or profanities, but one obscure scatological reference and some sarcastic innuendoes; light action and comic violence such as blowing up toys and a dog chewing toys and some scary toys prove to be nice guys in the end; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, bully gets his comeuppance.

Summary:

The first totally computer animated movie TOY STORY answers the question “What happens to my toys when I leave the room?” in a wonderful, moral, fantastic way. Woody a cowboy doll, voiced by Tom Hanks, envies the new favorite toy in town, Buzz Lightyear, space ranger, voiced by Tim Allen. When Woody and Buzz are left behind at a gas station, they have to start working together to get home. TOY STORY is funny, clean, wholesome, and virtuous – a masterpiece which is sure to capture the imaginations of young and old alike.

Review:

Pixar and Disney are re-releasing the original TOY STORY and TOY STORY 2 in 3D in a special double feature, in advance of next summer’s highly anticipated 3D movie TOY STORY 3.

The 3D process brings the timeless classic TOY STORY to wonderful life. Woody, Buzz Lightyear and the gang are more real than ever before, and just as much fun!

What strikes one most, however, while watching the original TOY STORY is just how great a masterpiece of animation it truly is, and how heartfelt. It’s like re-visiting a beloved old friend. Director John Lasseter and his team of writers, animators and actors deserve all the kudos they received when TOY STORY first came out, and more.

Below is our original review as it appeared in MOVIEGUIDE®:

The first totally computer animated movie is TOY STORY. It answers the question "What happens to my toys when I leave the room?" in a wonderful, moral, fantastic way that will capture the hearts of children of all ages. In the movie, Woody is a cowboy doll, voiced by Tom Hanks, the hero in the world of Andy's toys – that is, until Andy gets Buzz Lightyear, space ranger, voiced by Tim Allen. Woody comes down with a strong case of envy, and creates a situation that causes Buzz to fall out the window.

When he can't find Buzz, Andy grabs Woody to take to Planet Pizza. As Mom drives off, Buzz climbs onto the back of the car. At a gas station, Buzz and Woody are fighting so seriously that the car drives off without them. Thus, they have to start working together to get back home. On the way, however, they are commandeered by Sid, the neighborhood boy, who pulls the heads off dolls and blows up toys. The final chase is a masterpiece.

The movie is overflowing with heroism, virtues and moral messages, not the least of which is that while envy can only destroy, friendship can overcome. The double entendre in the film will make it just as appealing to teenagers and adults as it is to younger children.

TOY STORY has a heart of gold. It is funny, clean, wholesome, and virtuous. It is a classic beginning to a new genre – a masterpiece which is sure to capture the imaginations of young and old alike.

In Brief:

The first totally computer animated movie is TOY STORY. It answers the question "What happens to my toys when I leave the room?" in a wonderful, moral, fantastic way that will capture the hearts of children of all ages. Woody is a cowboy doll, voiced by Tom Hanks, the hero in the world of Andy's toys – that is, until Andy gets Buzz Lightyear, space ranger, voiced by Tim Allen. Woody comes down with a strong case of envy, and creates a situation that causes Buzz to fall out the window. When Woody and Buzz are left behind at a gas station, they have to work together to get home.

The movie is overflowing with heroism, virtues and moral messages, not the least of which is that while envy can only destroy, friendship can overcome. The double entendre in the film will make it just as appealing to teenagers and adults as it is to younger children. TOY STORY has a heart of gold. It is funny, clean, wholesome, and virtuous. It is a classic beginning to a new genre – a masterpiece that is sure to capture the imaginations of young and old alike.