TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME

Battle of the Sexes

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 07, 2001

Starring: Vivica A. Fox, Morris Chestnut, Anthony Anderson, Wendy Raquel Robinson, Tamala Jones, & Bobby Brown

Genre: Romantic Comedy/Sex Farce

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Address Comments To:

John Calley, Chairman/CEO
Sony Pictures Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPa, AbAb, C, LLL, V, SS, NN, A, D, MM) Pagan worldview with scenes wherein going to a Christian church is used for personal sexual benefit & man reveals that some black Americans go to church to find women with whom to fornicate; about 102 obscenities (many lightweight, only a few “f” words) & 1 mild profanity (“My God”) plus plenty of sexual dialogue & one use of “N” word; woman fights with cheating boyfriend, smashing things in his apartment, & women briefly fight in fantasy sequence; implied fornication & plenty of discussion about sexual matters (but usually not extremely offensive, mostly just an overall lackadaisical attitude about premarital sex); partial nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, men & women play a game of brinksmanship with one another, plus jealousy, cheating & subterfuge.

Summary:

A comedy about the battle between the sexes, TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME stars Vivica A. Fox as a smart advertising executive who institutes a “Ten Day Plan” to get her boyfriend back in line. TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME is quite amusing at times, but it contains some frank, foul-mouthed dialogue, a strong lackadaisical attitude about premarital sex and some anti-Christian content.

Review:

TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME is a sex farce set among a group of African-American professionals in Los Angeles. It’s an R-rated depiction of the classic battle between the sexes.

Vivica A. Fox plays advertising executive Shanté Smith, who is so adept at keeping her boyfriend Keith happy and committed that her best girlfriends ask her for advice. When Shanté catches Keith dancing with her arch-rival Conny, she institutes her “Ten Day Plan” to get her man back in line. Keith, however, has plans of his own to let her know who’s boss. He follows the advice of his buddy, Tony, who knows all about the games that a smart woman like Shanté can play. With her relationship and reputation at stake, Shanté has to think fast and stay a step ahead of Keith and Tony.

TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME starts slow, but builds comic momentum when Keith and Shanté try to anticipate each other’s next move. Vivica A. Fox (KINGDOM COME) does a fine job as the female lead and is ably supported by Morris Chestnut (THE BEST MAN and THE BROTHERS) as Keith and Anthony Anderson (KINGDOM COME and EXIT WOUNDS) as Tony. Regrettably, the movie seems to slow down again at the end; it needs a better, funnier finish. Also, the movie includes plenty of foul language and sexual dialogue. It also includes scenes which mock the Christian commitment of many African Americans. In fact, the whole movie has a strong lackadaisical attitude about premarital sex. Therefore, MOVIEGUIDE® cannot really recommend it.

In Brief:

A comedy about the battle between the sexes, TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME stars Vivica A. Fox as advertising executive Shanté Smith, who is adept at keeping her boyfriend Keith happy and committed. When she catches Keith dancing with her arch-rival Conny, however, she institutes her “Ten Day Plan” to get her man back. Keith, however, plans to let her know who’s boss. He follows the advice of his buddy, Tony, who knows all about the games that a smart woman like Shanté play. With her relationship and reputation at stake, Shanté has to think fast and stay a step ahead of Keith and Tony.

TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME starts slow, but builds momentum when Keith and Shanté try to anticipate each other’s next move. Vivica A. Fox performs well as the female lead as do Morris Chestnut as Keith and Anthony Anderson as Tony. The movie needs a better, funnier finish, however. Also, it includes plenty of foul language and sexual dialogue. It also contains two scenes which mock the Christian commitment of many African Americans. In fact, the whole movie has a strong lackadaisical attitude about premarital sex.