UPSIDE DOWN

An Upside Down Mess

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 15, 2013

Starring: Kirsten Dunst, Jim Sturgess,
Timothy Spall, Frank Ahearn,
Vincent Messina, Holly
O’Brien

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Millenium Entertainment

Director: Juan Solanas

Executive Producer: Phil Hope, James Skotchdopole

Producer: Claude Leger, Dimitri Rassam,
Aton Soumache, Jonathan
Vanger, Alexis Vonarb

Writer: Juan Solanas

Address Comments To:

Bill Lee, CEO, Millennium Entertainment (A subsidiary of Exclusive Media Group)

5900 Wilshire Blvd., 18th Floor

Los Angeles, CA  90036

Phone:  (310) 893-6289; Fax:  (323) 937-0934

Website:  www.millenniumentertainment.me; Email:  info@millenniumentertainment.me

Content:

(RoRo, B, C, Acap, CapCap, L, VV, S, A, D, M) Strong Romantic worldview of emotional “love” being the greatest power of all, mixed with some moral, redemptive elements of sacrifice, some anti-capitalistic elements but also some pro-capitalistic elements using free market principles to stop the bad guys; three profanities, man urinates; action violence includes woman falling and knocking her head, blood pours out, man is shot in shoulder, and intense chase scenes; implied sexuality, kissing, breasts are mentioned; no nudity; light drinking; man smokes cigar; and man pretends to be somebody else.

Summary:

UPSIDE DOWN is a romance set in an interplanetary world where two people in love must overcome gravity itself. UPSIDE DOWN is visually stunning, but lacks quality storytelling and depth. The movie’s mixed worldview, action violence, and implied sexuality warrant extreme caution.




Review:

UPSIDE DOWN is set in an extremely peculiar universe where two planets that live next to each other have dual gravity. The number one rule of dual gravity is that “all matter is pulled by the gravity of its own world, and not the other.” The two planets are connected by a bridge owned by a giant corporation called “TransWorld” that’s milking the oil out of the “Down” planet. The “Up” planet prospers while “Down” decays in poverty. Travel between planets is restricted and very hard to actually do because the gravity of ones own planet pulls them back. Gravity is the strongest force in the universe. All of this is narrated by Adam who lives on Down. Adam believes the only thing stronger than gravity is love.



Adam’s story begins when he was a young boy who’d spend time with his aunt on weekends. Adam would climb the nearby mountain that was so high, it could nearly reach the other planet. One day while playing on top of the mountain he sees a girl named Eden on Up, and he introduces himself to her. They develop a friendship that turns into a romantic relationship as they grow older.



Adam figures out a way to pull Eden to Down so they can spend time with each other briefly before her own gravity pulls her back to Up. One day, some soldiers cut their visit short. Adam tries to send Eden back to Up, but he’s shot in the process and drops her. Eden falls back on her planet and takes a blow to her head that will ultimately take her memory away.



Seven years later, Adam works tirelessly to invent something that would break the gravity barrier between planets. One day, he sees Eden on television. Shocked that she’s still alive, Adam is determined to find her, but Adam has no knowledge of Eden’s memory loss. How will he sneak between worlds without guards noticing all the while his own gravity pulling him back to Down.



UPSIDE DOWN has a clever, intriguing concept. The incredible visuals give this fantastical world a sense of awe and wonder. Sadly, this is all it has going for it. The overly narrated story either explains too much or too little about this odd world. Many of the scenes hold little purpose for the overall story and are simply there for visual stimuli. The cast was more than capable of delivering good performances, but the poor script and bad direction held them back.



The movie’s Romantic worldview is mixed with some moral, redemptive aspects of sacrifice, but it ultimately lacks depth. Even though a giant corporation is the bad guy, in the end, the good guys use free market conventions to bring them down. Along with the worldview issues, UPSIDE DOWN also has some light foul language, action violence, and implied sexuality that warrant extreme caution.

In Brief:

UPSIDE DOWN is set in a peculiar universe where two planets next to each other have dual gravity. All matter is pulled by the gravity of its own world, and not the other. One planet prospers while the other one decays in poverty. Travel between planets is prohibited and extremely difficult. A love interest develops between Adam who lives on the lower decaying planet and Eden who lives on the rich upper planet. Everything seems against them, even gravity itself.



 



UPSIDE DOWN has a clever, intriguing concept. Incredible visuals give this fantastical world a true sense of awe and wonder. Sadly, this is all it has going for it. The overly narrated story either explains too much or too little of this odd world. Many of the scenes hold little purpose for the overall story and are simply there for visual stimulation. The Romantic worldview is mixed with some moral, redemptive aspects of sacrifice, but the movie ultimately lacks depth. Along with the worldview issues, UPDIDE DOWN has some light foul language, action violence and implied sexuality requiring extreme caution.