WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER Add To My Top 10

Depraved Spoof

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 27, 2001

Starring: Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Showalter, Marguerite Moreau, Molly Shannon, & Paul Rudd

Genre: Comedy/Spoof

Audience: Teenagers & young adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 97 minutes

Distributor: USA Films

Director: David Wain

Executive Producer:

Producer: Howard Bernstein

Writer: Michael Showalter & David Wain

Address Comments To:

Scott Greenstein, Chairman
USA Films
100 North Crescent Drive, Garden Level
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Phone: (310) 385-4000
Fax: (310) 385-4408
Website: www.usafilms.net

Content:

(PaPaPa, O, Ab, HoHo, LLL, SSS, N, A, DDD, MM) Strong pagan worldview favoring sexual hedonism with an occult scene where a teenager appears to conjure up a windstorm, plus people boo performance of a song from the play GODSPELL about Jesus Christ & solid homosexual elements; at least 56 obscenities (including many “f” words) & 20 profanities; some comical violence including fighting & pratfalls; strong sexual immorality, including implied fornication, depicted sodomy, homosexual kissing, & many crude sexual references; partial nudity including people in swimsuits; alcohol use; smoking & depicted hard drug use played for a spoof; and, lying, man speaks to talking can of vegetables, anti-Vietnam War veteran stereotype, & young boy seriously plans to marry older adult woman, 35.

Summary:

WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER is a poorly done spoof of summer camp movies starring Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce of TV’s FRASIER and Molly Shannon of TV’s SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE. It contains a strong pagan worldview, many crude sexual references, solid homosexual content, depicted drug use, and a display of occult powers.

Review:

Coming straight to your video store from a brief, unsuccessful run at the theater is WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER, a poorly done spoof of summer camp movies like MEATBALLS with Bill Murray. Set in 1981 at Camp Firewood, it tells a group of disparate stories. Janeane Garofalo plays Beth, the director of the camp. David Hyde Pierce of TV’s FRASIER plays a science teacher that Beth likes. Michael Showalter, who co-wrote the lame script with director David Wain, plays a forlorn counselor named Coop who’s in love with Counselor Katie who’s in love with Counselor Andy. Molly Shannon of TV’s SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE stars as an older, divorced camp counselor who’s consoled by a 10-year-old boy. At the end of the movie, she and the boy decide to get married.

Sex is the primary focus of WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER, although attempts are made to provide some laughs about camp life, like the camp talent show which ends the movie. There is also a sequence, however, where most of the counselors visit the local town and take all kinds of drugs, including heroin. This, of course, is meant as a joke, for they all go back to camp and appear as if nothing happened. Naturally, there is plenty of strong foul language in this R-rated comedy. WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER also has a decidedly pagan worldview, which favors sexual hedonism and promiscuity. The movie also contains some brief occult elements and solid homosexual content.

In Brief:

Coming straight to your video store from a brief, unsuccessful run at the theater is WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER, a poorly done spoof of summer camp movies. Set in 1981 at Camp Firewood, it tells a group of disparate stories. Janeane Garofalo plays Beth, the director of the camp. David Hyde Pierce of TV’s FRASIER is a science teacher that Beth likes. Michael Showalter plays a forlorn counselor named Coop who’s in love with Counselor Katie who’s in love with Counselor Andy. Molly Shannon of TV’s SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE stars as an older, divorced camp counselor who’s consoled by a 10-year-old boy.

Sex is the primary focus of WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER, although attempts are made to provide some laughs about camp life, like the camp talent show which ends the movie. There is also a sequence, however, where most of the counselors visit the local town and take all kinds of drugs, including heroin. This, of course, is meant as a joke, for they all go back to camp and appear as if nothing happened. Naturally, there is plenty of strong foul language in this R-rated comedy, which has a decidedly pagan worldview