WHERE'S MARLOWE

Comical Dream Quest

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Miguel Ferrer, Mos Def, John
Livingstone, Allison Dean,
John Slattery, Clayton Rohner,
& Elizabeth Schofield

Genre: Mockumentary/Detective Fiction

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 99 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Classics

Director: Daniel Pyne

Executive Producer: Aaron Lipstadt, John
Mankiewicz & Daniel Pyne

Producer: Clayton Townsend

Writer: John Mankiewicz & Daniel Pyne

Address Comments To:

Paramount Classics
A Division of Paramount Pictures
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier #215
Los Angeles, CA 90039
Phone: (323) 956-2000
Fax: (323) 862-1103
Website: www.paramountclassics.com

Content:

(Ro, LLL, VV, SS, NN, A, D, M) Romantic worldview satirizing humanity, private detective movies & documentaries; 29 obscenities & 15 profanities, a couple vulgar lines & non-graphic sexual references, & an image of dog feces; some violence, the strongest of which are two scenes where men hold guns at other people while shouting, in one case nearly scaring an old woman to death, & murder takes place off screen, but no corpse is shown; images of depicted sex between unknown couple, adultery & voyeurism; upper male & female nudity in depicted sex scene; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying, fits of anger, stealing confessed.

Summary:

WHERE’S MARLOWE? is a low-budget, pseudo-documentary, or mockumentary, about two filmmakers shooting a documentary about a small-time private eye firm. Regrettably, this comedy also includes a strong sexual scene with partial nudity, plenty of strong foul language and a scene where an old lady is nearly scared to death.

Review:

WHERE’S MARLOWE? is a low-budget, pseudo-documentary, or mockumentary, about two filmmakers shooting a documentary about a small-time private eye firm. The agency is run by two close friends, Joe Boone and Kevin Murphy. When Boone finds out that Murphy has been sleeping with a client’s wife, the two men part company in anger. The filmmakers decide to help Boone, a likable but moody man, work cases so he can pay some bills before he closes the office. Their decision leads to more comical situations and a real murder case.

WHERE’S MARLOWE? is shot in the style of the mockumentary THIS IS SPINAL TAP, with many silly conversations in a documentary format. The title refers to novelist Raymond Chandler’s famous detective hero, Phillip Marlowe. In fact, some events in the movie resemble events in some of Chandler’s novels, especially THE LONG GOODBYE, a book that’s generally considered to be Chandler’s masterpiece. The story also contains allusions to Dashiel Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON.

WHERE’S MARLOWE? satirizes humanity in a rather cold way, even though Boone comes across as a sympathetic, sad sack sort of character. The movie depicts him and the two filmmakers as working men clumsily pursuing their dreams. In its final scene, however, the movie implies that the art of film can never really reveal the truth of people’s lives. Regrettably, the movie also includes a strong sexual scene with partial nudity, plenty of strong foul language and a scene where an old lady is nearly scared to death.

In Brief:

WHERE’S MARLOWE? is a low-budget, pseudo-documentary, or mockumentary, about two filmmakers shooting a documentary about a small-time private eye firm. The agency is run by two friends, Joe Boone and Kevin Murphy. When Boone finds out that Murphy has been sleeping with a client’s wife, the two men part company in anger. The filmmakers decide to help Boone, a likable but moody man, work cases so he can pay some bills before he closes the office. Their decision leads to comical situations and a real murder case.

WHERE’S MARLOWE? is similar to THIS IS SPINAL TAP, with many silly conversations in a documentary format. The title refers to novelist Raymond Chandler’s famous detective hero, Phillip Marlowe. In fact, some events in the movie resemble events in Chandler’s novels. WHERE’S MARLOWE? satirizes humanity in a rather cold way, even though Boone comes across as a sympathetic, sad sack sort of character. The movie depicts him and the two filmmakers as working men clumsily pursuing their dreams. Regrettably, this comical movie also includes a strong sexual scene with partial nudity, plenty of strong foul language and a scene where an old lady is nearly scared to death