WHITE PALACE

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 19, 1990

Starring: Susan Sarandon, James Spader,
Jason Alexander, Kathy Bates,
& Eileen Brennan

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 90 minutes

Distributor: Universal Studios

Director: Luis Mandoki

Executive Producer:

Producer: Mark Rosenberg, Amy Robinson &
Griffin Dunne

Writer: Ted Tally & Alvin SargentBASED
ON THE NOVEL BY: Glen Savan

Address Comments To:

Content:

Promiscuity, fornication, oral sex, and overt sex scenes; male rear nudity and female nudity; some obscenities and profanities; and, alcohol abuse and drunkenness

Summary:


Review:

When Max Baron's wife dies in an automobile accident, Max falls apart and becomes reclusive for two years. Then, he meets Nora, a middle-aged, vodka-swilling redneck who flips hamburgers at a fast-food joint called White Palace. Set in St. Louis, WHITE PALACE is based on Glen Savan's novel by the same title.

Max, a young Jewish advertising executive on the rise, has had a long run of celibacy while grieving for his dead wife. He lives in a comfortable, insulated world and prefers the solitude of his apartment. Nightly, he holes up with Proust, Mozart and memories of happier times.

Nora Baker's life, on the other hand, has been anything but insulated. A passionate woman of 43, she is 14 years Max's senior, and has had her share of hard knocks, including a sour marriage and a teenage son whose death from alcohol and drugs still haunts her.

From the time they meet, with all their differences, they seem like the proverbial odd couple. She likes the National Inquirer, the Oak Ridge Boys and something called tuna wiggle. He prefers the classics and spaghetti pomodoro. Max buys designer olive oil: Nora's fridge is filled with bologna, frozen french fries and Ding Dongs. Yet, a romance develops from their initial encounter over some missing hamburgers.

The film deals with their developing love affair as each copes with the other's alien world. To some extent, the film is also a pygmalion story as both Nora and Max change to please the other.

Although the story line is a fairly interesting one about an unlikely love affair, the torrid sex scenes outside of marriage cannot be sanctioned by Christians. Also, the scenes involving both male and female nudity must be condemned. The Bible is clear concerning a Christian's attitude about sex outside marriage: "Flee sexual immorality. Every sin that a man does is outside the body, but he who commits sexual immorality sins against his own body" (I Corinthians 6:18).

In the final analysis, WHITE PALACE is no more than a decrepit shack which deserves to be condemned to make way for more substantial structures.

In Brief: