WHITE SANDS Add To My Top 10

Content -3
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 24, 1992

Starring: Willem Dafoe, Mickey Rourke, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, & Mimi Rogers

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 100 minutes

Distributor: Warner Brothers

Director: Roger Donaldson

Executive Producer:

Producer: Daniel Pyne

Writer: Bill Sackheim & Scott Rudin

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Content:

(LLL, VV, SS, NN, M) Roughly 35 obscenities, 10 profanities; bloody, close-up violence in shooting victims at point-blank range & car crashes; fornication episode & upper female nudity; and, theft, robbery & extortion.


Summary:

WHITE SANDS is a suspense thriller set in New Mexico about a small-town sheriff (Willem Dafoe) who uncovers disturbing evidence, beginning with a corpse, that may involve the FBI. The movie is well-crafted with dramatic cinematography and competent acting. Regrettably, it contains a fornication scene, intense violence and considerable foul language.


Review:

The film WHITE SANDS opens with the discovery of a corpse in the New Mexican desert. Sheriff Ray Dolezal assumes the identity of the dead man to solve the case. Dolezal's wife, Molly, is not keen on her husband's new role. Dolezal becomes aware of various FBI agents in the mystery and seeks to draw them into the open. Also, he meets Lane Bodine, girlfriend of Gorham Lenox, one of the men with whom he makes a deal. Lane entices him sexually, despite the fact that he says he loves his wife. One day a black FBI agent forces him into a car and drives off. Lenox runs the car off the road giving Dolezal a chance to escape. Several loose ends come together at the end with a reversal of circumstances. The black agent flees into the sand dunes of New Mexico with the briefcase, falls and the briefcase opens up to reveal nothing but sand.
This scene serves so well to substantiate the vanity of life. As the writer of Ecclesiastes said: "Vanity of vanities; all is vanity" (1:2). Too bad the filmmakers didn't understand this truth. Nevertheless, the movie contains competent acting and is well-crafted. Regrettably, it also contains a fornication scene, intense violence and considerable foul language.


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