FAR FROM HOME

Overcoming Bitterness to Discover Hope

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 09, 2014

Starring: Barry Watson, Stefanie Von
Pfetten, Paul McGillion, Aleks
Paunovic, Wesley MacInnes,
Trevor Lerner, Barbara
Pollard, Patricia Harras,
Keith Martin Gordey, Lorne
Cardinal, Christina
Jastrzembska, Venus Terzo

Genre: Drama/Romance

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: TV-PG

Runtime: 87 minutes

Distributor: UP TV

Director: Michael Scott

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Harvey Kahn

Writer: Bryar Freed

Address Comments To:

Charley Humbard, President and Brad Siegel, Vice Chairman, UP TV
2077 Convention Center Concourse, Suite 300
Atlanta, GA 30337
Phone: 1-877-446-7735; Fax: (770) 692-8899
Website: www.watchgmctv.com

Content:

(BB, C, Acap, L, A, M) Strong moral worldview with some Christian, redemptive content and elements, including protagonist learns to forgive and find hope and faith, and a funeral takes place at a church, some light anti-capitalist elements, though slightly resolved; four light obscenities and two light profanities; no violence; no sex scenes or sexual immorality, but there’s a passionate kiss at the end; no nudity; light drinking; no smoking or drugs; and, character is manipulative and criminal, but is caught, and protagonist lies a few times and throws a rock through a window, but changes by the end.

Summary:

FAR FROM HOME is a movie from UP TV about an author forced to visit the hometown he ran away from when his uncle dies. FAR FROM HOME is very entertaining and well written, with a positive moral, redemptive premise, but there is some light, brief foul language and a light anti-capitalist theme that, however, is resolved somewhat positively.

Review:

FAR FROM HOME is a very well made TV movie about overcoming bitterness and rediscovering faith.



Nicholas Bell is a one-time bestselling author, who teaches at a community college. He tells people he’s working on a new novel after his successful novel, BROKEN WINDOWS, but, truthfully, nothing inspires him anymore, and he hasn’t written anything in years. When Nicholas finds out the uncle that raised him just died, he must visit the home on the San Juan, Wash. islands that he ran away from 15 years prior.



On arriving in San Juan, Nicholas is reminded of how beloved his uncle was on the island, even though he himself refused to speak to him after running away. His uncle’s lawyer, Libby, is an attractive, forthright woman. She tries to convince Nicholas to move back and take over the newspaper, but he steadfastly refuses, stating he’s only there for the funeral.



As Nicholas revisits the quirky island and its residents, he’s reacquainted with old friends. He also learns that local businessman and land developer, Graham Westlake, is hoping to turn the island into a new tourist hotspot with a marina, hotels, and fancy parks. In the process, Graham and the bank are foreclosing many of the Islands long standing residents. His uncle’s paper was one of the few and most powerful forces against Graham’s developments. However, the paper is now deeply in debt, and Graham offers to buy it from Nicholas, relieving him of his uncle’s unpaid loans.



The question is, Will Nicholas give into the man who’s shaking up the town?



FAR FROM HOME holds interest throughout and is a major step forward in UPtv’s original programming. The characters, though formulaic, hold strong with natural dialogue and good acting. The landscape of San Juan Island provides a perfect backdrop for the story and is never boring to view. Nicholas, still bitter at his uncle for a past tragedy, learns to forgive and find faith again, though the faith aspect is a little obscure and not as overt as it should be.



The only questionable elements, other than some light foul language, is the fact that the villain is a businessman and a bank owner. For a town that’s struggling, the major tourist developments would help boost the local economy. To vilify such an endeavor is illogical. (SPOILERS FOLLOW) Thankfully, however, the movie somewhat redeems itself by showing that fraud was the underlying problem, not capitalism. As Tim Allen’s businessman character remarked last fall on the “Shoveling Snow” episode of LAST MAN STANDING, the free market “only works if there’s some moral compass to it.”



Overall, FAR FROM HOME is entertaining and heartwarming and only warrants a light caution.

In Brief:

FAR FROM HOME is a very well made TV movie about overcoming bitterness and rediscovering faith. Nicholas Bell is a one-time bestselling author, who teaches at a community college. When he learns that the uncle who raised him died, he decides to visit his hometown on San Juan Island, Washington, the place he ran away from 15 years ago. Arriving home, he finds out his uncle left him the local newspaper. The paper’s latest story involves a conspiracy to take homes away from local residents to turn the island into a tourist hotspot.



FAR FROM HOME holds interest throughout and is a major step forward in UP TV’s original programming. The characters, though formulaic, hold strong with natural dialogue and good acting. Nicholas, still bitter at his uncle for a past tragedy learns to forgive and find faith again. However, the faith aspect is a little obscure and not as explicit as it should be. The only objectionable elements in FAR FROM HOME, other than some light foul language, is some anti-capitalist content that, however, is resolved in a positive way.