2050

"A Humanist Defense for Using Sex Bots and Pleasure Robots"

Quality:
Content: -4 Gross immorality, and/or worldview problems.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

2050 is a slow-moving science fiction movie about a married man who falls in love with a customized female robot after his brother-in-law introduces him to his voluptuous robot girlfriend. Michael is married with two children. His brother-in-law introduces him to his compliant robot girlfriend, Quin. Dissatisfied in his marriage, Michael soon orders his own customized robot mistress and names her Sophia. However, Michael finds himself falling in love with her. Will Michael’s wife find out about Sophia? What will Michael say or do when she does?

2050 is too slow and talky, without much jeopardy. Also, the acting is just serviceable in places, though the script probably is the real cause, not bad acting. In one scene, the movie makes some interesting points about the nature of human love. However, it ultimately sides with mankind’s future creation of human-looking robots or androids to suit people’s pleasure, whether for mere companionship or sex, inside and outside of marriage. Thus, 2050 eventually takes a strong humanist, anti-theist, immoral, amoral view. It movie also has lots of gratuitous foul language, sexual content and explicit nudity.

Content:

(HHH, AbAbAb, EvEv, PCPC, B, Cap, Ho, LLL, SSS, NNN, AA, DD, MM) Very strong humanist worldview with ultimately an anti-theist viewpoint in story about a married man falling in lust and love with an android/robot designed only for the owner or human user’s pleasure (sexually as well as for companionship), the ending ultimately sides with the creation and use of the androids for anything humans so desire, married man tells his estranged wife at the end that people would not have invented God if human relationships were enough (such as a relationship between a married couple), and the comment becomes a defense for using sex bots even in a marriage, character uses a quote from Charles Darwin to make a politically correct point, some moral elements but overcome by the movie’s humanist worldview, and salesman makes a capitalist but amoral defense of his business, plus an implied homosexual relationship in one quick scene

Foul Language:
About 73 obscenities (more than half are “f” words), 13 strong profanities (all but one or two involve Jesus directly), three light profanities, and black female dietician and health nut uses an “n” word to describe a white man

Violence:
No violence

Sex:
Very strong sexual content includes one or two scenes of depicted adulterous fornication, three images of depicted oral sex, one scene of implied fornication as a man and female walk down a hallway to a room, sounds of sex as a woman lies on top of a man, naked man (no genitals shown) as a man on a bed talks to a female with exposed breasts, references to sex bots, implied homosexuality in bar as two men are shirtless, single man discusses with a married woman their affair and proclaims his love for her, and references to adultery

Nudity:
Extreme nudity as movie opens with a scene of totally nude female robots being constructed with life-like female breasts and genital areas, scenes with upper female nudity, many images of female cleavage, and several scenes with upper male nudity

Alcohol Use:
Some alcohol use, and a character says he wants to “just get drunk”

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking but one reference to drugs; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Lying, a man shifts the blame for his own actions to another person, but he is chastised by that other person, and eventually the movie reveals that the married man’s wife cheated on him with another man, so the movie seems to blame the wife for his infidelity.

More Detail:

2050 is a slow-moving science fiction movie that presents a humanist defense for making and using artificial android robots for human pleasure, including sex.

The movie begins with a quote from David Levy who said, “By 2050 people will not only be having sex with robots, they will fall in love with them.” This serves as the premise for this disturbing movie that examines not only the future of society but also the blurred lines between reality and fantasy and morality and immorality. From the first few scenes, it’s apparent that the filmmakers not only want to give viewers a glimpse into where society is heading in terms of artificial intelligence but also want to ask viewers, “What do you need to be fully satisfied?” In doing that, they don’t contradict the humanist conclusion of the two main characters, a married man who falls in love with a robot and his newly estranged wife.

At the urging of his spouse, Michael Greene and his wife, Brooke, suddenly drop in to see Brooke’s brother, Drew, who just happens to be making love with his new female sex-bot, called Quin. Drew lies and tells them Quin is his new human girlfriend. In fact, Drew just broke up with his longtime girlfriend, who left Drew for a male sexbot.

While Brooke and Drew are in the kitchen, Michael discovers that Quin is actually an android, a robot designed to look human in almost every way. Drew begs Michael not to tell his sister, and Michael agrees. Drew tells Michael, “Get the lingo right. They are called e-mates.”

As Drew explores his relationship with his e-mate, Quin, Michael becomes disenchanted with his marriage. Father to two small children and a tired wife, he tries to spice things up in the bedroom, but Brooke just laughs. Shortly thereafter, Drew he directs Michael to a place called Butterfly Chasers, a bar where people create, converse and have sexual relationships with their android e-mates.

Michael visits the club to scope it out. Most of the humans are just conversing with their android companions, but a couple are doing other things. Maxwell, the “bartender” at the club, shows Michael that he can custom design his own android and make her or him do anything he wants, innocuous or not.

On a second trip to the bar, Michael creates Sophia, a beautiful blonde with piercing blue eyes. Customizing her to his every whim, the two disappear into a room to have sexual relations. This quickly becomes a regular occurrence. At first, the relationship is just sexual, but eventually Michael believes he’s actually fallen in love with Sophia. Distraught that this is totally ruining his marriage, he goes to Maxwell the bartender to complain. Maxwell turns out to be the android company’s owner. Maxwell isn’t bothered at all by Michael’s revelation that he’s fallen in love with Sophia. In fact, he’s quite pleased that he has, even though he knows Michael is married. However, when Michael tries to blame his feelings for Sophia on Maxwell, for creating androids such as Sophia, Maxwell gives Michael a tongue-lashing about human free will and the amazing ubiquitous capacity of human beings to fall in love with just about anything, in many different ways.

Will Michael’s wife find out about Sophia? What will Michael say or do when she does?

2050 is too slow and talky. There’s not much jeopardy, and, except for a few moments and Dean Cain’s performance as the bartender, some of the acting is just serviceable. The cinematography is interesting, however, often panning the skyline as drones deliver pizzas and other packages, littering the sky like birds in a world where human society is slowly being swallowed up by technology. Also, the soundtrack is a bit strange, consisting mostly of quirky classical pieces underlying the scenes in lengthy bits.

In one scene, the movie makes some interesting points about the nature of human love. It also lays the blame on human beings for the crazy predicaments they often create for themselves. However, 2050 ultimately sides with mankind’s future creation of human-looking robots or androids to suit people’s pleasure, whether that be for mere companionship or even sex, both inside and outside of marriage. There’s also a reference to evolution and a comment that says people invented God. Thus, 2050 eventually takes a strong humanist, anti-theist, immoral, and amoral view toward the creation of sex-bots and androids. The movie also has lots of foul language, sexual content and explicit nudity.

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