300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE

"Blood Splattering as “Entertainment”"

Quality:
Content: -4 Gross immorality, and/or worldview problems.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE is 102 minutes of beheadings, amputations, and gut slicing, used as an opportunity to spurt, scatter, and spray cinematic blood. The backdrop is the battle of Salamis between the Persians and the Greeks in 480 BC. The Greek commander Themistokles attacks the larger Persian forces immediately after they come ashore. In the process, Themistokles fires an arrow that kills the Persian king. Pushed by the female naval hero, Artemisia, the king’s son, Xerxes, swears revenge. He even sells his soul to demonic forces to become a “god” king. Xerxes and Artemisia send a huge navy to crush the upstart Greeks but find the task much more difficult than they imagined.

There is probably a great story somewhere in the battle of Salamis, but it got lost in this spectacle of bloodletting. This was no accident. Even the poster features the number 300 as a blood splatter with a red tinted “wave of blood” in the background. With all the bloody violence and some strong lewd content, media-wise moviegoers probably will find RISE OF AN EMPIRE unacceptable viewing.

Content:

(Pa, FRFR, OO, B, PP, L, VVV, SS, NN, A, MM) Pagan Greeks fight demon possessed Persians in defense of freedom; five mumbled obscenities and one clear reference self stimulation; extreme violence’s includes prolonged scenes of gruesome sword battles with amputations, beheadings and all manner of wounding with gallons of blood splattering (even the end credits are animated scenes with the splattering red blood purposely made prominent), woman delivers severed heads of several kings to her king, ship battles include combatants burned to death or drowned; one outrageous sex scene with violence and nudity; several scenes of upper female nudity, plus upper male nudity throughout; alcohol use; no smoking or drug use; and, one king surrenders himself to demonic possession in order to be more effective in seeking revenge and extreme pursuit of revenge.

More Detail:

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE is 102 minutes of beheadings, amputations, and gut slicing, used as an opportunity to spurt, scatter, spray, and drip cinematic blood. With some foul language, demonic motivation, a graphic sex scene, and extreme violence, the movie is abhorrent, despite some rousing speeches favoring freedom over tyranny.

The backdrop for the movie’s exercise in blood splattering is the battle of Salamis between the Persians and the Greeks in 480 BC. The brave Greek commander Themistokles attacked the much larger Persian forces immediately after they landed when they would be tired from all their rowing. In the course of the shocking victory, Themistokles fired an arrow that killed the Persian King, Darius. Pushed by the female naval hero, Artemisia, the king’s son, Xerxes swears revenge. He even sells his soul to demonic forces to become a “god” king. Xerxes and Artemisia send a huge navy to crush the upstart Greeks, but they find the task much more difficult than they imagined.

In the movie’s favor, several short speeches are given favoring freedom and democracy over tyranny. These are weak excuses to watch a movie where the opposing generals, Themistokles and Artemisia wind up in a bizarre, violent sex scene complete with nudity. Cecil B. Demille could have made a movie about the battle and sent audiences home thinking about the value of freedom. This movie sends audiences home thinking about how much blood really spurts out of someone sliced in the gut with a sword – five gallons or ten.

As MOVIEGUIDE® Publisher Ted Baehr loves to teach, “Great movies are great stories, well told.” There is probably a great story somewhere in the battle of Salamis, but it got lost in the spectacle of bloodletting. This is no accident. Even the poster features the number 300 as a blood splatter with a red tinted “wave of blood” in the background.

It’s a sad statement that this bloodlust is considered entertainment. The filmmakers are betting on audiences wanting waves of blood. They may win their bet. However, MOVIEGUIDE® believes many, if not most, media-wise moviegoers will avoid the movie’s sex and violence and not help them win.

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