50/50

"True Friendship Stands True"

Quality:
Content: -2 Discretion advised for adults.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

50/50 tells the story of Adam, an NPR radio writer living in Seattle in his late 20s. Adam appears to be the picture of health, but he’s experiencing back pains. When gets checked by his doctor, Adam learns he has a rare form of spinal cancer that leaves him with just a 50/50 chance of survival. Adam has a comically contentious relationship with his meddling mother and a strangely distant relationship with his girlfriend, but his best friend, Kyle, stands as his rock of support. Sadly, Adam doesn’t turn to God to deal with his disease. Instead, he begins counseling with a young female psychology student named Katherine. Adam is initially reluctant to open up to Katherine, but as his existing relationship falls apart, their friendship edges into genuine affection for each other while he learns to have a better relationship with his mother.

50/50 is a touching, well-acted and well-produced drama with a healthy dose of comedy thrown into the mix. It’s marred, however, by a large, excessive amount of profanities and obscenities, as well as by the best friend’s frequent attempts at sexual humor in the movie’s first half.

HEADLINE: ** True Friendship Stands True **

Title: 50/50

Quality: * * * * Acceptability: -2

SUBTITLES: None

WARNING CODES:

Language: LLL

Violence: None

Sex: SS

Nudity: N

RATING: R

RELEASE: September 30, 2011

TIME: 99 minutes

STARRNG: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Seth Rogen, Anna Kendrick, Anjelica Huston, Bryce Dallas Howard, Philip Baker Hall, Matt Frewer

DIRECTOR: Jonathan Levine

PRODUCERS: Evan Goldberg, Ben Karlin, Seth Rogen

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Nathan Kahane, Will Reiser

WRITER: Will Reiser

BASED ON THE BOOK BY: N/A

DISTRIBUTOR: Summit Entertainment

CONTENT: (RoRo, H, B, LLL, SS, N, AA, DD, M) Strong Romantic worldview with a light humanist bent and some light moral elements; more than 200 obscenities and profanities, plus implied vomiting; no violence; strong sexual references include frequent discussion of sexual wishes and fantasies in the movie’s first half by the protagonist’s best friend and unmarried couple lives together so there’s implied fornication; upper male nudity; casual drinking is shown on several occasions, including a scene where the depressed protagonist drinks the sorrows from his cancer diagnosis away in great drunkenness; man on chemotherapy for cancer gets high on sweets laced with marijuana and smokes marijuana with his friend, leaving the impression marijuana is basically a normal and harmless activity, which is not the case; and, protagonist is extremely angry and unforgiving towards an ex-girlfriend who admitted cheating on our lead character though she seems to sincerely ask for forgiveness and protagonist has a comically contentious relationship with his meddling mother but they grow closer as the story plays out.

GENRE: Drama/Comedy

INTENDED AUDIENCE: Older teenagers and adults

REVIEWER: Carl Kozlowski

REVIEW: 50/50 is a highly touching, well-cast and well-produced drama with a healthy dose of comedy included. It has some lewd content and frequent foul language, however, that warrants extreme caution.

50/50 tells the story of Adam, an NPR radio writer living in Seattle who’s in his late 20s and appears to be the picture of health, but Adam’s been experiencing back pains, and when he gets checked by his doctor, Adam learns he has a rare form of spinal cancer that leaves him with just a 50/50 chance of survival.

Adam has a comically contentious relationship with his meddling mother and a strangely distant relationship with his girlfriend (Howard), but his best friend, Kyle, stands as his rock of support in one of the most affecting portrayals of male friendship in quite some time. Sadly, Adam doesn’t turn to religion to deal with his disease. Instead, he begins counseling with a very young female psychology student named Katherine. Adam is at first reluctant to open up much to Katherine, but as his existing relationship falls apart, their friendship edges into genuine affection for each other while he learns to have a better relationship with his mother.

50/50 offers a simple story that’s exceedingly well told, making it one of the most emotionally uplifting films for adults this year.

It’s marred, however, by a large, excessive amount of profanities and obscenities, as well as by the best friend’s frequent attempts at sexual humor in the movie’s first half. Thus, the movie’s characters reflect the paganization of many young adults today.

By the end, however, 50/50 shows that a relationship built on deeper emotions and a core of friendship is much more valuable than one rooted in cheaper desires. That said, the support of a best friend, the lead character’s family and a burgeoning romance are made to seem like they are the only means necessary for a person to win his battle against death. This apparently reflects the life of the young screenwriter who wrote 50/50 based on his own personal experience with cancer.

Please address your comments to:

Rob Friedman, CEO

Summit Entertainment

1630 Stewart Street, Suite 120

Santa Monica, CA 90404

Phone: (310) 309-8400

Fax: (310) 828-4132

Website: www.summit-ent.com

SUMMARY: 50/50 is about a young man who suddenly has to cope with a rare form of spinal cancer that leaves him with just a 50/50 chance of survival. 50/50 is a highly touching, well-acted and well-produced drama with a healthy dose of comedy mixed in, but it has some lewd content and very frequent foul language, and the protagonist is not religious, so media-wise viewers should take note.

IN BRIEF:

50/50 tells the story of Adam, an NPR radio writer living in Seattle in his late 20s. Adam appears to be the picture of health, but he’s experiencing back pains. When gets checked by his doctor, Adam learns he has a rare form of spinal cancer that leaves him with just a 50/50 chance of survival. Adam has a comically contentious relationship with his meddling mother and a strangely distant relationship with his girlfriend, but his best friend, Kyle, stands as his rock of support. Sadly, Adam doesn’t turn to God to deal with his disease. Instead, he begins counseling with a young female psychology student named Katherine. Adam is initially reluctant to open up to Katherine, but as his existing relationship falls apart, their friendship edges into genuine affection for each other while he learns to have a better relationship with his mother.

50/50 is a touching, well-acted and well-produced drama with a healthy dose of comedy thrown into the mix. It’s marred, however, by a large, excessive amount of profanities and obscenities, as well as by the best friend’s frequent attempts at sexual humor in the movie’s first half.

Content:

(RoRo, H, B, C, LLL, SS, N, AA, DD, M) Strong Romantic worldview with a light humanist bent and some light moral, redemptive elements, including a pastor reads Scripture during a funeral; more than 200 obscenities and profanities, plus implied vomiting; no violence; strong sexual references include frequent discussion of sexual wishes and fantasies in the movie’s first half by the protagonist’s best friend and unmarried couple lives together so there’s implied fornication; upper male nudity; casual drinking is shown on several occasions, including a scene where the depressed protagonist drinks the sorrows from his cancer diagnosis away in great drunkenness; man on chemotherapy for cancer gets high on sweets laced with marijuana and smokes marijuana with his friend, leaving the impression marijuana is basically a normal and harmless activity, which is not the case; and, protagonist is extremely angry and unforgiving towards an ex-girlfriend who admitted cheating on our lead character though she seems to sincerely ask for forgiveness and protagonist has a comically contentious relationship with his meddling mother but they grow closer as the story plays out.

More Detail:

50/50 is a highly touching, well-cast and well-produced drama with a healthy dose of comedy included. It has some lewd content and frequent foul language, however, that warrants extreme caution.

50/50 tells the story of Adam, an NPR radio writer living in Seattle who’s in his late 20s and appears to be the picture of health, but Adam’s been experiencing back pains, and when he gets checked by his doctor, Adam learns he has a rare form of spinal cancer that leaves him with just a 50/50 chance of survival.

Adam has a comically contentious relationship with his meddling mother and a strangely distant relationship with his girlfriend (Howard), but his best friend, Kyle, stands as his rock of support in one of the most affecting portrayals of male friendship in quite some time. Sadly, Adam doesn’t turn to religion to deal with his disease. Instead, he begins counseling with a very young female psychology student named Katherine. Adam is at first reluctant to open up much to Katherine, but as his existing relationship falls apart, their friendship edges into genuine affection for each other while he learns to have a better relationship with his mother.

50/50 offers a simple story that’s exceedingly well told, making it one of the most emotionally uplifting films for adults this year.

It’s marred, however, by a large, excessive amount of profanities and obscenities, as well as by the best friend’s frequent attempts at sexual humor in the movie’s first half. Thus, the movie’s characters reflect the paganization of many young adults today.

By the end, however, 50/50 shows that a relationship built on deeper emotions and a core of friendship is much more valuable than one rooted in cheaper desires. That said, the support of a best friend, the lead character’s family and a burgeoning romance are made to seem like they are the only means necessary for a person to win his battle against death. This apparently reflects the life of the young screenwriter who wrote 50/50 based on his own personal experience with cancer.

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