56 UP

"Classic Documentary Series Continued"

Quality:
Content: +1 Discernment required for young children.

Rent or Buy:

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Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

56 UP is the eighth in a documentary series about 12 English children growing up. The series began when the children were seven and is filmed every seven years. The original concept was to show the different lives of rich and poor children. The most remarkable thing about the series is the development of the families – marriage, children, grandchildren, divorce, and second marriages. Rich or poor, liberal or conservative, the importance of family stands out.

56 UP is more than two hours, so there’s a lot of talk. However, this is to be expected considering the movie’s nature. Some of the participants resent being lifetime public spectacles, and some have refused to participate some years. One of the remarkable things is to see the wisdom acquired with age. Clips from 7, 14, and 21-years-old show a lack of understanding, direction and purpose. As time passes, people settle into careers and family responsibilities. Clips from age 56 show a deep concern for the next generation and occasionally some remorse. 56 UP has no foul language, but does have some light sexual references.

Content:

(B, C, Pa, S, N, D, M) Light moral worldview showing the importance of family in a documentary about children filmed every seven years since the 1960s, with some of the people being Christian and some not being Christian, and with a number of divorces; no foul language, but one admonition not to fart in the family tent when camping; no violence; no sex, but one remark about unpublished writing being like “masturbation” and some light mentions of sexuality; upper male nudity in some brief scenes at a beach where people wear bathing suits; no alcohol; one female is shown smoking at age 21; and, references to divorce and some remorse is expressed.

More Detail:

56 UP is the eighth in a series of documentaries about 12 English children growing up. The series began when the children were seven and is filmed every seven years. The original concept was to show the different lives of some rich and some poor children.

The most remarkable thing about the series is the development of the families – marriage, children, grandchildren, divorces, and second marriages. Rich or poor, liberal or conservative, the importance of family stands out. One family moved to Australia and one family to the United States. The saddest character in the story is the one who decided not to have children, because he feared passing down some mental health issues. He didn’t marry, either.

56 UP is more than two hours, so there’s a lot of talk, talk, talk. However, this is to be expected considering the movie’s nature. Some of the participants resent being lifetime public spectacles and some have refused to participate some years. One of the remarkable things is to see the growing wisdom acquired with age. Clips from 7, 14, and 21-years-old show a lack of understanding, direction and purpose. As time goes on, people settle into careers and family responsibilities. Clips from age 56 show a deep concern for the next generation and occasionally some remorse.

56 UP isn’t a movie for everyone, but for some it will be fascinating. It’s interesting that some of the interviewees actually look better at 56 than they did at 14 or 21. While some look a bit worn and tattered, others have aged with grace and dignity.

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