THE EYE (2002)

Quality: Content: -4 "ABHORRENT"
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Content:

(PaPaPa, OOO, FRFRFR, C, L, VVV, M) Very strong pagan worldview with occult elements of tormented ancestor ghosts and dead family members, including reincarnation references, ancestor worship and clairvoyance as well as redemptive theme of forgiveness; one curse of "Go to hell"; strong, scary violence includes two suicides, young boy jumps out of window (impact and remains not seen) and woman hangs herself (graphically portrayed), exorcism portrayed, little girl verbally and physically abused due to her clairvoyance, patient with scarred flesh; ghost with no lower body attacks woman, boy's body seen after accident (a few cuts and scrapes with some blood), ghost on elevator has half of face caved in, glimpse of a charred, burning man running, little boy drowns, ghost of woman commits suicide nightly and calls for mother's help, huge explosion in slow motion with many bodies seen to burn and melt before our eyes, with charred bodies remaining; and, suicidal woman channels through clairvoyant woman, and mother forgives woman who committed suicide (causing reconciliation so girl's soul can rest in peace), and incense and candles burnt to the dead and to ancestors.
GENRE: Supernatural Thriller
PaPaPa
OOO
FRFRFR
C
L
VVV
M

Summary:

THE EYE tells a scary tale of a woman, blind since the age of two, who receives cornea implants from an anonymous donor and, frighteningly, discovers that she is now seeing into the supernatural realm. Even though there is a powerful and touching encounter with the theme of forgiveness, the supernatural, occult and pagan elements make THE EYE unacceptable fare for media-wise people.

Review:

THE EYE tells the tale of a woman named Mun, blind since the age of two, who receives cornea implants from an anonymous donor. As she adjusts to her new eyesight, she witnesses faceless shadows (angels of death) taking away the souls of those who die, and those who are not whisked away by the angels seem to wander the earth tormented. When the ghosts realize that she can see them, they seem to be attracted to her, seeking relief.
There are plenty of creepy ghosts to scare and weird viewers out. Many of the situations are lost on western audiences due to ignorance of the ways of the East, including both the sense of honor and traditional ancestor worship. One of the ghosts is a little boy who has lost his report card. It turns out that his parents didn’t believe that the card was lost, but that his grades were so low he “lost” it on purpose. He commits suicide over the dishonor. Mun, with her new corneas, sees the little boy wandering the hallways of her apartment building searching for the lost report card. In one scene, he sits eating the candle his parents leave burning outside their apartment door on the altar built in his honor. The Chinese may find this more significant, or maybe even hideous.
The second part begins as Mun realizes, through a shocking revelation, that the person who donated her corneas needs help too. She takes a trip to the donor’s hometown and finds that the donor’s mother has rejected her because of her cowardly suicide. The donor’s name was Ling. She was clairvoyant. From her childhood, she would warn her fellow villagers of pending disasters. As the disasters happened, the people began to look upon Ling as a freak. They would throw stones at her, keep her from their children and call her a witch. As a woman, Ling clairvoyantly saw the town going up in flames. She tried to warn her neighbors, but, consistent with their past response to her, they laughed, scorned and chased her off. When many of her fellow villagers died in a great fire, Ling flipped out and hung herself. Mun tries to bring reconciliation to the family so that both the living and dead can find peace.
After over an hour of this film, that is of noticeably “foreign” quality, the third part looks, distractingly, like it was produced in Hollywood. The production value skyrockets as if a special effects house created it. It seems that Mun, because of her “gift,” must relive, to some degree, an aspect of Ling’s life. Can she avert what Ling was unable prevent? Will she have to live the rest of her life seeing dead people? The “Hollywood ending” literally answers these questions with a bang.
Even though there is a powerful and touching encounter with the theme of forgiveness, the supernatural, occult and pagan elements make THE EYE unacceptable fare for any media-wise family.
Please address your comments to:
Palm Pictures
601 West 26th Street, #601
New York, NY 10001
212.320.3673
SUMMARY: THE EYE tells a scary tale of a woman, blind since the age of two, who receives cornea implants from an anonymous donor and, frighteningly, discovers that she is now seeing into the supernatural realm. Even though there is a powerful and touching encounter with the theme of forgiveness, the supernatural, occult and pagan elements make THE EYE unacceptable fare for media-wise people.

In Brief: