THE SHAPE OF THINGS

Content:

(HHH, B, AbAb, FeFe, Ro, LLL, V, SS, N, M) Very strong modern humanist worldview about a man affecting tremendous changes to please his girlfriend, with some moral elements, but they are also challenged, ridiculed and ultimately cast off, as well as feminist elements wherein woman is referred to as a Messiah figure and gross feminist performance art; very strong language includes 38 obscenities (16 "f" words), three blasphemies, and 15 profanities; violence includes fighting, shoving, slapping, and old scars described as evidence of self-mutilation; implied fornication, implied oral sex, much talk about sex and male organ, woman grabs man's clothed crotch, kissing and couple wearing underwear shown in bed, and discussion of strong feminist performance art where "artist" removed a tampon in public and wrote in menstrual blood (this so-called "art" is defended but moral character argues it is disgusting); no explicit nudity, but male pubic hair visible as man shows off tattoo, some cleavage shown, upper male nudity, woman in underwear, and nearly nude statue shown; drinking and smoking; horoscope sign briefly mentioned; many spiritual references, some twisting of popular scripture; much twisting of morality and notions of free will, improving the human condition, and God helping people to change, plus lying, deception, and inappropriate behavior strongly rebuked. GENRE: Drama

Summary:

THE SHAPE OF THINGS is a morally offensive story of relationships and the power exerted on others to bring about change, about a young man's efforts to improve himself to win a woman's love and approval. An intelligently written charmer in the same cruel vein as IN THE COMPANY OF MEN, this Neil LaBute story explores the myriad levels of power and manipulation within male-female relationships, but the story's humanist values are in opposition to God's teachings and, therefore, morally reprehensible.

Review:

THE SHAPE OF THINGS cleverly poses the question: “What would you do for love?” It opens as Evelyn, a young and beautiful art student, captures the attention of Adam, a shy and homely museum guard. Adam is immediately hooked and begins a relationship that will change him to the core. The story follows their romantic relationship over the next 16 weeks and Adam’s efforts to improve himself to win Evelyn’s love and approval.
THE SHAPE OF THINGS is in the same cruel vein as IN THE COMPANY OF MEN and THE BUSINESS OF STRANGERS. The story by director Neil LaBute tackles the allures and dangers between men and women, and explores the myriad levels of power and manipulation within these relationships. It succeeds in doing so, but fails on the moral scale in that it argues Modern Humanist dogma to the bitter end. Morally speaking, the story’s sentiments would not stand up to minor scrutiny or challenge, but the movie does not allow opposing viewpoints to be raised. All in all, THE SHAPE OF THINGS is an intelligently written charmer but the story’s promoted values are in opposition to God’s teachings and, therefore, morally reprehensible.

In Brief: