SLEIGHT

"Immoral Drug"

Quality: Content: -4 "ABHORRENT"
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Summary:

SLEIGHT is an edgy, well-acted drama about a college-age black man who does street magic to earn some money to take care of his young sister but also sells drugs on the side for a slimy smooth-talking black man with a violent streak. SLEIGHT doesn’t go out of its way to be an evil movie but the young hero, underneath it all, is just as selfish a criminal as the drug dealing villain, even when he must save his sister after the villain kidnaps her. SLEIGHT also contains many gratuitous “f” words, brief graphic violence and many abhorrent drug references.

Review:

SLEIGHT is an edgy, well-acted drama about a college-age black man who does street magic to earn some money to take care of his young sister, but also sells drugs on the side for a slimy smooth-talking black man with a violent streak. SLEIGHT doesn’t go out of its way to be an evil movie, but the young hero, underneath it all, is just as selfish a criminal as the drug dealing villain, even when he must save his sister after the villain kidnaps her. SLEIGHT also contains many gratuitous “f” words.

SLEIGHT opens with high school graduate Bo performing street magic in Los Angeles for money. Holly, a beautiful community college student, is impressed when Bo levitates a ring. So, she drops her phone number into his cash stash on the sidewalk. Watching from the sidelines is Bo’s younger sister, Tina. Bo cooks and takes care of Tina because their mother recently died.
That night, it’s revealed that Bo also earns money by being a low-level delivery boy for a smooth-talking but slimy and pretentious drug dealer named Angelo. Bo hopes to make just enough money from this nefarious job so he and Tina can move out of their dangerous neighborhood.

Trouble between Bo and Angelo arrives when Angelo gives Bo a kilo of cocaine to sell, but Bo cuts the cocaine with fake white powder to make it two kilos. Angelo finds out about Bo’s attempt to make even more money without telling him. He demands Bo triple the $15,000 Bo promised him from selling the cocaine. Things get worse and worse for Bo and his sister when he comes up $6,000 short.

SLEIGHT is well acted, but the story’s a bit preposterous and implausible. The movie reveals that Bo (who had to give up a science scholarship when his mother died) has inserted an electromagnet with wires into his right arm to levitate things. Bo uses this device to solve his conflict with Angelo in a crazy way. Also, Bo not only deals drugs, he also steals to come up with the money to pay off Angelo. Furthermore, at one point Angelo forces Bo to cut off a rival’s hand. Also, because her mother physically abuses her, Holly starts staying with Bo in his room, and, eventually, they run off together without getting married. Finally, the way in which Bo solves his problem with Angelo is a thoroughly humanist one that also involves violence and threats of violence. In other words, the protagonist in this movie doesn’t become better or less selfish, he seems to become worse and more selfish.

SLEIGHT also contains many gratuitous “f” words, brief graphic violence and many abhorrent drug references. Clearly, the filmmakers should have gone back to the drawing board. They kind of wasted some fancy cinematography and fancy acting on an unbelievable movie with too many moral problems.

Content:

(HH, FRFR, B, LLL, VVV, S, N, A, DDD, MM) Strong humanist worldview where the conflict and the plot problem are resolve by humanist meanings that include threats of violence and examples of violence to show that the threats are real and one character says, “Thank God” at one point; 61 obscenities (mostly “f,” “s” and “h” words) and eight light exclamatory profanities; some very strong violence includes drug dealer orders protagonist to chop off a rival’s left hand, and he does so with several whacks (includes image of severed hand), and protagonist uses electromagnetic device to rip man’s teeth out of his mouth, and strong and light violence includes some gunplay, villain fires gun at protagonist, but protagonist uses electromagnetic device to stop the bullets and fling them at villain, where they are drilled more and more into villain’s skull until he relents, kidnapping, rival gang beats up protagonist until he’s unconscious and then ties him up in car trunk, but he escapes before they can murder him, threats of violence, some hitting, and man is forced to beat himself in the head with a baseball bat; no sex scenes implied or depicted but brief kissing, and protagonist’s new girlfriend eventually comes to live with him and his younger sister, plus males and females party in a house and at a dance club; upper male nudity in one or two scenes and images of woman’s bra as she puts on T-shirt for bedtime; some alcohol use; smoking and extensive drug dealing and some marijuana use and references to Ecstasy and cocaine; and, strong immorality includes moral relativism, protagonist steals money from dance club safe to pay off drug dealer boss, bullying by villain, lying, and protagonist justifies selling Ecstasy to young people who want to party as if it’s no big whoop.

In Brief:

SLEIGHT is a drama about a young black man who does street magic to earn some money to take care of his young sister but also sells drugs on the side. High school graduate Bo works for a slimy, smooth-talking black man with a violent streak named Angelo. Bo hopes to make just enough money so he and Tina can move out of their dangerous neighborhood. Trouble erupts between Bo and Angelo when Angelo gives Bo a kilo of cocaine to sell but Bo cuts the cocaine with fake white powder to make it two kilos. Things get worse and worse for Bo and his sister.

SLEIGHT is well acted, but the story’s preposterous and implausible. The movie reveals that Bo has inserted an electromagnet with wires into his right arm to levitate things. Eventually, he adds lots of power to this device to defeat Angelo and his gang. Bo also steals money to pay back Angelo. Looking at this story and its premise, SLEIGHT has a strong humanist worldview with many “f” words, brief graphic violence and many abhorrent drug references.