YES

"A Plea for Human Understanding"

Quality: Content: -2 "EXTREME CAUTION"
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

Summary:

YES is an independent movie about the romance between a Muslim doctor from Lebanon and a married American scientist of Northern Irish descent. Except for some political and religious implications, and some quirky minor characters, the two main characters and their affair are not all that interesting.

Review:

YES is an independent movie about the romance between a Muslim doctor from Lebanon and a married American scientist of Northern Irish descent. The doctor has immigrated to England, because the Muslims fighting in Lebanon won’t let him practice his calling on their enemies. Now, he works as a cook because he can’t get a license to practice. The scientist is estranged from her English husband, a politician who is cheating on her.
At a banquet, while her husband flirts with other women, the scientist is pleased to accept the doctor’s own flirtatious interest. The couple soon begins a secret illicit affair, but the doctor is eventually put off by her western ways. He breaks off the affair just when she was getting ready to leave her increasingly tumultuous marriage. When her beloved Irish aunt, a Communist atheist, dies, she invites the doctor to come with her to Havana, Cuba.
The dialogue in YES is completely in verse. This makes the movie somewhat out of the ordinary, as does the scientist’s gregarious housekeeper, who has several lengthy monologues about the trail of dirt that human beings leave behind them but that can never be erased. Except for some political and religious dialogue, however, the two main characters are not all that interesting. Their affair is passionate, but seems relatively pointless. Ultimately, the movie is a plea for human understanding, with the love affair serving as a metaphor. The housekeeper’s satirical commentary appears to belie this happy ending, however.

Content:

(Pa, Ro, Acap, PC, C, B, FR, H, Co, LLL, V, S, N, A, D, M) Mixed pagan worldview, light Romantic elements, some anti-capitalism and political correctness, and brief, interesting dialogue about religion and God between a Christian, a Muslim and a humanist, whom the Muslim severely admonishes at one point, plus other brief mentions of God, as well as woman’s dying aunt is supposed to be a Communist; at least 63 mostly strong obscenities (mostly “f” words), two strong profanities and five light profanities; man brandishes knife during argument as two men almost come to blows; implied adultery, man lies in bed with married woman, man kisses and caresses married woman, and woman’s husband flirts with other women; upper male nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, racism and racial conflict.

In Brief:

YES is an independent movie about the romance between a Muslim doctor from Lebanon and a married American scientist of Northern Irish descent. The scientist is estranged from her English husband, a politician who is cheating on her. At a banquet, while her husband flirts with other women, the scientist accepts the doctor’s own flirtatious interest. The couple soon begins a secret illicit affair, but the doctor is eventually put off by her western ways. He breaks off the affair just when she was getting ready to leave her increasingly tumultuous marriage. When her beloved Irish aunt, a Communist atheist, dies, she invites the doctor to come with her to Havana, Cuba, but will he come?
The dialogue in YES is completely in verse. This makes the movie somewhat out of the ordinary, as does the scientist’s gregarious housekeeper, who has several lengthy monologues about the trail of dirt that human beings leave behind them but that can never be erased. Except for some political and religious implications, the two main characters are not all that interesting. Their affair is passionate, but seems pointless. Ultimately, the movie is a plea for human understanding.