I'LL BELIEVE YOU Add To My Top 10

Anything Goes

Content -1
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 09, 2007

Starring: David Alan Basche, Patrick Warburton, Cece Pleasants, Fred Willard, Chris Elliott, Ed Helms, and Mo Rocca

Genre: Science Fiction Comedy

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 87 minutes

Address Comments To:

Mark Borde, Mike Doban and Susan Jackson
Co-Presidents
Freestyle Releasing
24995 Pacific Coast Highway, Suite A-103
Malibu, CA 90265
Phone: (310) 456-2332
Fax: (310) 456-7919
Website: www.freestylereleasing.com
Email: mark@freestylereleasing.com

Content:

(Pa, C, O, B, LL, V, DD) Light pagan worldview with some positive Christian moments as well as some psychic and UFO elements and several good moral points; eight light obscenities and three light profanities; some chase scenes but no overt violence; no sex; no nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

I’LL BELIEVE YOU is a light science fiction comedy about a late night talk show host sets off a series of wacky incidents when an alien calls his show, talks for five minutes and hangs up. I’ll BELIEVE YOU is a mixed bag, with some thrilling moments and some funny moments, but also with a lot of stupid humor, flat dialogue, purposeless action, and some light foul language.

Review:

I’LL BELIEVE YOU is a light science fiction comedy about a late night talk show host, Dale, who is willing to believe any of the far-fetched stories that people calling in tell to him. One regular caller says she just saw a UFO land. Dale doesn’t take her seriously until the next night at 1:13 a.m., when an alien calls his show, talks for five minutes and hangs up.

Ratings soar. The alien even speaks English. Dale sets up debates between psychiatrists and psychics. The psychiatrist has serious issues about his own past. Everyone in the town of Melourne, Florida is intrigued, including the guy who raises alligators that eat out of his hand. A local college physicist, the romantic interest Paige, seems to effectively dismiss the alien theory until a string of robberies suggest somebody is trying to build a spaceship. Things come to a head when local police capture the alien, played by Patrick Warburton. He looks awfully human. Is he an alien? Is he human? Is he insane?

I’ll BELIEVE YOU is a mixed bag. For a low-budget comedy, there are some thrilling moments and some funny moments, but there’s also a lot of stupid humor, flat dialogue and purposeless action. The ending almost, but not quite, redeems the whole movie.

Clearly, this movie was made to be a family movie, but there is foul language in it. Clearly, there are some good story ideas, but it seems aimed at 6-year-olds. Clearly, there are some good ideas and good moral virtues, but they are almost over-shadowed by scatological humor and really dumb plot situations.

Patrick Warburton is the best part of this movie, but you need more than one actor to make a movie work.

In Brief:

I’LL BELIEVE YOU is a light science fiction comedy about a late night talk show host, Dale, who wants to believe his callers’ far-fetched stories. One caller says she just saw a UFO land. Dale doesn’t take her seriously until an alien calls, talks for five minutes and hangs up. Ratings soar. The alien speaks English. Dale sets up debates. Then, a string of robberies suggest somebody is trying to build a spaceship. Things come to a head when local police capture the alien, played by Patrick Warburton. He looks human. Is he an alien? Is he human? Is he insane?

I’ll BELIEVE YOU is a mixed bag, with some thrilling moments and some funny moments, but also with a lot of stupid humor, flat dialogue, purposeless action, and some light foul language. The ending almost redeems the whole movie. There are some good story ideas, but it seems aimed at 6-year-olds. There are some good ideas and good moral virtues, but they are almost over-shadowed by stupid scatological jokes and dumb situations. Patrick Warburton is the best part, but you need more than one actor to make a movie work.