THE MASK

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 29, 1994

Starring: Jim Carrey, Peter Riegert, Cameron Diaz, Richard Jeni, Peter Greene, & Max (as dog Milo)

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Adults & older teenagers

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 95 minutes

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Content:

(NA, LL, VV, S, N, O, M) Pagan worldview in which aggressive nature is necessary for problem solving; 14 obscenities, 5 profanities (exclamatory) & numerous vulgarities & sexual innuendoes; shoot outs & gunfire, fist fights, car chases, & slapstick violence -- none gory; no sex, but 2 prolonged kisses; no nudity, but 1 female character wears revealing clothing; brief occultism -- 1 reference to ancient mask as representative of Norwegian night god of mischief, Loki; and, robbery & theft by main character who uses cash for partying, & dog urinates on man.

Summary:

A timid bank clerk releases all his repressed inhibitions when an ancient mask brings out a supernatural, cartoon-like alter ego, emerging only when he wears ... THE MASK. This otherwise surprisingly enjoyable movie's message falls short, teaching that nice guys do finish last, unless they can muster up a wildly aggressive dark side able to overcome adversity and stand up for number one.

Review:

A timid bank clerk releases all his inhibitions when an ancient mask summons a supernatural, cartoon-like alter ego, emerging only when he wears ... THE MASK. Jim Carrey stars in the Dark Horse Comics fantasy as terminal nice-guy Stanley Ipkiss, constantly down on his luck and always finishing last until he finds a strange looking mask floating in the river. Edge City may never be the same once Stanley slips on the mask only to be consumed in a tornado-like whirlwind and emerge as a green-faced, zoot-suited, wild man with the biggest set of caps this side of Whoopi Goldberg.

Dazzling special effects by George Lucas' Academy Award winning Industrial Light & Magic bring THE MASK to life. While star Jim Carrey's on-screen canine sidekick, Max, deserves an Oscar, Carrey is the real surprise. Carrey's normal shtick is perverse, obnoxious and disgusting, but in THE MASK his wacky style (under control with director Chuck Russell) is a perfect fit. This otherwise surprisingly enjoyable movie's message falls short, teaching that nice guys finish last, unless they can muster up a wildly aggressive dark side able to overcome adversity and stand up for number one. With a slight change in the resolution, this would have been a more acceptable movie. As it is, it is an slick and entertaining "horny-boy" movie as they say in Hollyweird.

In Brief: